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Undercover Boss - Real People Testimonials

Find out what people are saying about the new show 'Undercover Boss' - a show about bosses who go undercover in their own companies to see how their employees get by. Catch the premiere after the Superbowl! Only CBS!

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I wish they'd do an "Undercover Underling" show, where minimum wage/ respect employees get a crack at being the boss.

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Courtesy of; REALITY TV MAGAZINE

Undercover Boss: Cleaning Things Up at Waste Management

February 7, 2010 11:41:53 by Nancy Floyd

Tonight after the Super Bowl, CBS unveils a new reality show, Undercover Boss. The show follows high-level corporate execs as they go undercover in their own companies to gain a better understanding of what life is really like for their blue-collar workers. Tonight

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Courtesy of: REALTIY TV MAGAZINE

Undercover Boss: Checking Out Hooters

February 15, 2010 12:05:58 by Nancy Floyd

Tonight on a new episode of Undercover Boss on CBS, Coby Brooks, President and CEO of Hooters goes undercover in his own restaurants. The single father spent five days working in various Hooters restaurants across Texas and learned a thing or two about making wing sauce, what the public really thinks about the controversial franchise, and those teeny-tiny shirts

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Courtesy of: REALITY TV MAGAZINE

Undercover Boss Visits 7-Eleven

February 22, 2010 01:19:13 by Nancy Floyd

Tonight

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Courtesy of: REALITY TV MAGAZINE

Undercover Boss: White Castle

March 1, 2010 12:19:00 by Nancy Floyd

On an all-new episode of Undercover Boss on CBS, viewers are taken behind-the-scenes at America

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I've only caught this show twice now, but liked it both times. I like that the top boss gets to see his workers in a new perspective which causes him/her to appreciate the hard work they go to in order for their company to function. I think it makes them value their employees more. I'd love to see some of these min wage workers get a pay increase, maybe benefits.

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Courtesy of: ZAP2IT

'Undercover Boss' rehired at CBS

By Hanh Nguyen

March 9, 2010 2:44 PM ET

CBS has renewed its contract for "Undercover Boss."

The network has ordered a second cycle of its hit new reality series for the 2010-2011 season.

"Undercover Boss" follows the wacky, real-life adventures of a company bigwig who employs nefarious disguises (shaving!) to go undercover and work amongst his/her people in the company. Eyes are opened, hearts swell and often, a few lives are changed.

Previous episodes featured bosses from Hooters, 7-11 and White Castle taking the challenge.

The renewal comes as no surprise, considering the show's high ratings. "Undercover Boss" debuted in the coveted post-Super Bowl spot to impressive numbers: 38.6 million viewers, making it the biggest post-Super Bowl show since "Survivor: The Australian Outback" premiered to 45 million-plus people in 2001.

Since then, it's maintained a healthy audience, averaging 18.74 million viewers.

"We are thrilled with the overwhelming response to the series and how audiences seem to connect to it on several levels," says Jennifer Bresnan, Senior Vice President, CBS Alternative Programming. "The wish fulfillment of seeing the top boss perform jobs of the rank and file is universal, and the employees' stories discovered at each company are often relatable and inspirational."

We were skeptical at first, but this is one of our favorite programs.

Anyone else happy the show will be back? What other companies should be featured?

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Courtesy of: CBS PRESS EXPRESS

CBS ANNOUNCES FOUR MORE COMPANIES PARTICIPATING IN THE FIRST SEASON OF "UNDERCOVER BOSS"

03.12.2010

CBS announced today the four remaining companies who are participating in the first season of UNDERCOVER BOSS. The series airs Sundays (9:00-10:00 PM, ET/PT) on the CBS Television Network.

The remaining Season One companies are:

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Still enjoy this show!!! Join us in chat to talk about it live on Sundays after Amazing Race.

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Courtesy of: REALITY TV MAGAZINE

Undercover Boss: Churchill Downs

March 14, 2010 07:46:00 by Nancy Floyd

On an all-new episode of Undercover Boss on CBS, viewers are taken undercover into Churchill Downs, host of the Kentucky Derby. Churchill Downs COO, Bill Carstanjen is going undercover in his own company to see what life is really like for his employees. Keep reading for more details on his experience cleaning race suites, bathing horses, and running errands for jockeys

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Courtesy of: REALITY TV MAGAZINE

Undercover Boss: GSI Commerce

March 21, 2010 08:59:52 by Nancy Floyd

Tonight

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I didnt think Danielle was all that bad. Obviously he didnt know what to do and was letting the complaining caller take over. The stupid woman should have just said...ok fine i will pay the full price and then refund me the difference. She was just being a typical beeeooooch. If the system could not do what they wanted (even though it was not the customers fault) they were offering a solution to the problem. But like most of the public out there she just kept on and on. The woman did not let Danielle speak and was interupting her. Danielle had to take control of the situation and had to unfortanelty come accross as a bit aggressive. I did NOT hear her being rude to the woman at all. The stupid cow she was talking to just kept going on and on and Danielle just was like...here is your option. I also heard Danielle repeat the phrase...i am sorry..i appologize...i am happy to help you with that. I think the show just blew everything out of proportion. Too bad Danielle didnt let the undercover CEO handle the whole call. i would also like to have seen Danielle ask how he would have handled the situation. As far as that other guy is concerned i thought he and his huge smile were a bit....psycho!

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Courtesy of: MSN, CAREERS

'Undercover Boss' Spurs Shop-floor Changes

'I don't think I'll be able to do this tomorrow,' says one CEO

By Bill Briggs, msnbc.com contributor

After each grueling day in the grime -- his head whirling with revelations, inspirations and sanitation -- Waste Management president Larry O'Donnell shed his fake jumpsuit and fake name, came home and dumped his thoughts into a legal pad.

Like the five other corporate chiefs featured so far on the CBS ratings smash "Undercover Boss," O'Donnell said he picked up reams of business ideas, along with truckloads of trash. "I jotted them down every night before I went to sleep," he said, "so I wouldn't forget." In separate interviews, all six executives said time in the trenches taught them hard (if not humbling) lessons, many of which will prompt company changes.

Sure, much of the incognito intelligence these men gathered seems wincingly obvious to anyone who earns a buck any place other than a sumptuous corner office: Frontline jobs make you sweat, make you tired, and often leave you feeling underappreciated. Working for a living is tough. Shocker.

But for the roughly 140,000 people employed by the six companies profiled to date on the CBS show, maybe there's satisfaction in knowing that a few of their louder gripes have been seen, heard, felt -- and addressed.

At Waste Management, O'Donnell recognized the need to solicit advice from his garbage collectors before launching companywide initiatives.

"We want to reach out and grab somebody from the front line to throw them on the (decision-making) team," said O'Donnell, who appeared in the series' first episode following Super Bowl XLIV. "Hopefully, we can avoid those unintended frustrations; we can figure those out on the front end rather than after we've already implemented something."

Putting the rank in rank and file, O'Donnell vacuumed portable toilets and plucked papers at a landfill while posing as prospective employee "Randy." During one segment, "Randy" learned that his temporary supervisor, Walter Settles, suffers from kidney problems and requires dialysis. After the program aired, O'Donnell created an internal squad of trained "health monitors" -- Settles became the first -- who speak to co-workers about preventative steps they can take to avoid chronic diseases.

At a White Castle store in Ohio, where the chain's owner Dave Rife snapped on a hairnet and assembled cheeseburgers as a "trainee," health worries also consumed the backroom chatter, including one woman's tale of her heart attack. After finishing his covert shifts, Rife gave his workers online access to advice from nurses and dietitians, and decided his company would cover employee co-pays for preventative doctor visits. His nights behind the counter taught Rife, he said, the value of keeping his people well, and keeping his best people at White Castle.

"We've got some truly fantastic talent out there, and we need to learn how to cultivate that," Rife said. "Because so many people come to us, and it's their first job, they don't necessarily see it as a career. So we need to help develop them, show them there are opportunities within our organization, and our family, to stick around and really have a career."

7-Eleven CEO Joe DePinto said he had the same epiphany while -- as scruffy newbie "Danny" -- he mopped floors and brewed pots of coffee. In his red smock, DePinto met a nightshift clerk who already had put himself through college and was considering finding new employment. That convinced the CEO to upgrade internal training and install a "talent identification program."

"I don't want folks to think they come to work here and get in a job, take that job for a certain time but it becomes a dead end," DePinto said. "If they're doing a great job, we should position them to do other things."

That business lesson came with some cost: DePinto was filmed fumbling several basic tasks. He spilled coffee on the floor and fouled up a pastry-making assembly line. Indeed, all six bosses said they contemplated the possible disasters and embarrassments of appearing on the program. They had no control over what was aired.

Perhaps no honcho has faced a bigger risk than Coby Brooks, CEO of Hooters. He acknowledged that his chain -- known for its chicken wings, not to mention its waitresses' tight tank tops and orange short shorts -- has a "delicate ecosystem" that includes a "double entendre name" and the "perception" among some consumers "that Hooters degrades women."

"There was always the potential that it could blow up," said Brooks, who in the second episode adopted the persona "Scotty" and accompanied some waitresses outside to offer chicken wing samples. On camera, a passing woman chastised "Scotty" for, in her opinion, Hooters' exploitation of females.

For Brooks, the clash caused him to reconsider a basic tenet of public relations -- buffing up his brand by "educating the public better on all the good things that we do," including donating money to breast cancer research and employing "the largest percentage of females in the restaurant industry."

"We're held to a different standard and we're OK with that. We've grown up with that and we understand it," Brooks said. "We don't necessarily agree with it. We put (women) on a pedestal."

Still, that harsh, reality-TV moment made some of the show's participating CEOs shudder. Their 15 minutes of fame could easily, instantly, devolve into months of bad press.

"If I had found an experience like what happened with Hooters, that would not have been good," said Michael Rubin, founder and CEO of GSI Commerce, which services online retail companies through its call centers and warehouses.

Rubin's episode aired last night. His cover story was that he recently had been laid off as manager of a sporting goods store. He took home a simple, human reminder that fast-thinking entrepreneurs can't necessarily double as fast-packing box loaders. And that a full day's work is physically exhausting for millions of Americans.

"I went in with the attitude that I'm 37, I'm a quick study, I should be able to do these jobs really well," Rubin said. "But the first day, they had me packing boxes. And you have to pack a certain amount of boxes per hour. And I literally was watching this person in front of me and then watching myself, and it was pretty demoralizing.

"I was really working my butt off. I called my mom after the first day and said, 'I don't think I'll be able to do this tomorrow.' "

But Rubin found the experience so grounding, he is introducing a program at GSI Commerce that rotates executives to work temporarily in the company's call centers. At Hooters, Brooks has similarly mandated that all his executives spend a few days each year pulling restaurant duty. And at the race tracks of Churchill Downs -- home to the Kentucky Derby -- a new "Walk a Mile in Our Co-workers' Shoes Day" has reached the corporate starting gate, said chief operating officer Bill Carstanjen. In episode No. 5, Carstanjen donned jeans and a ball cap to wash horses and rake stalls.

The popularity of "Undercover Boss" -- CBS calls it the "number one new series of the season," averaging almost 19 million viewers per episode -- is fueled, in part, by angry and frustrated American workers who want, or maybe need, to see rich bosses struggle and bumble, many of the CEOs agreed. After the heads of some U.S. banks and automakers were blamed for the national recession, it just feels good to laugh at real, red-faced executives.

"The viewer ... gets to see that the 'big boss' is really is just a human being who isn't good at everything and, in fact," Carstanjen said, "has a lot to learn."

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I think this is one of the best shows. I love the concept... I personally think all CEO's of big corporations should do something like this in order to understand what their people do for them on a daily basis...good or bad. The company I work for is family owned & the sons are now in charge. When they were young, they all had to start with the basics & do the dirty work before moving up. Their Dad was always very hands on & knew what the little people had to endure. I really respect that & because of this, they respect their employees and appreciate the effort made to make their business viable.

Tina

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Courtesy of: REALITY TV MAGAZINE

Undercover Boss: Herschend Family Entertainment

March 28, 2010 08:13:43 by Nancy Floyd

Tonight on a brand new episode of Undercover Boss on CBS, the CEO of Herschend Family Entertainment goes undercover in his own company. Keep reading for more details about Joel Manby

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Courtesy of; REALITY TV MAGAZINE

Undercover Boss: Roto-Rooter

April 4, 2010 08:38:27 by Nancy Floyd

Tonight

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Courtesy of: REALITY TV MAGAZINE

Undercover Boss Season Finale: 1-800 Flowers

April 11, 2010 07:56:14 by Nancy Floyd

The season finale of Undercover Boss on CBS follows the President of 1-800-Flowers as he goes undercover in his own floral business. In tonight

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