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Terry O'Quinn as Locke

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Terry O'Quinn as Locke

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Terry O'Quinn's impressive gallery of film and television characters includes many diverse roles. He rose to prominence as the outwardly gentle but actually maniacal master of the house in Joseph Ruben's chilling The Stepfather. Though he went on to play leads in other films like Prisoners of the Sun and The Forgotten One, his weight was more effectively felt in supporting roles such as Howard Hughes in Disney's The Rocketeer.

Other feature film credits include Old School, The X-Files: Fight the Future, Primal Fear, Ghosts of Mississippi, Tombstone, Blind Fury, Young Guns, Black Widow, Heaven's Gate and Places in the Heart.

On television O'Quinn had starring roles in Millennium and Harsh Realm, with recurring roles on The West Wing, Alias and Jag. He has guest starred on Law & Order: Criminal Intent, The X Files and Roswell.

On Broadway O'Quinn appeared in Foxfire and Curse of the Aching Heart, and Off-Broadway in Richard III.

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O'Quinn finds peace, paradise in 'Lost'

By Frazier Moore

As the mysterious Locke on ABC's suspenseful "Lost," Terry O'Quinn (above) glories in his rich role. Locke, of course, was stranded on a tropical island with dozens of other passengers after their jetliner crashed in the opener. Since then, he has emerged as the series' mystical patriarch, a shamanic presence living his back-to-nature dream after a lifetime spent as a clerical shlub. Or is he just a nut job acting out a long Wild Man Weekend? Or a psycho ready to blow? Don't ask O'Quinn, who "Lost" viewers first met planted on the beach silently gazing out to sea. While the camera rolled, "I tried to think of heavy things: 'What does this mean?' And, 'What the hell do we do now?'"

Months later, he is still not sure if Locke is sinister or noble, delusional or divine - or all of the above. And he was as surprised as anyone by perhaps the series' most electrifying episode. Locke, in a flashback before the flight, was revealed to have been a paraplegic. Then, seen in the present on the beach, he rose, almost biblically, to his feet: Somehow he was healed! "I didn't even know that I had been handicapped until we shot that episode," O'Quinn says with a laugh.

What he does know is that "Lost" - airing 8 p.m. Wednesdays - is a genre-busting smash (by turns thrilling, spooky and tantalizing) that, from its September premiere, had critics agog and viewers snagged.

He also knows that "Lost" is steady, challenging work for a journeyman actor who has waited 30 years for this kind of break.

O'Quinn has been around plenty. Films include 1984's "Places in the Heart," the "X-Files" feature, "Old School" and (in the title role) 1987's horror classic "The Stepfather." He has been on Broadway, and his scads of TV appearances include recurring roles on "JAG," "The West Wing" and the spy series "Alias," which was created by J.J. Abrams, the mastermind of "Lost."

But as 2004 began, O'Quinn and his wife, Lori, had logged "a couple of years from hell." An actor who has chosen never to live in Los Angeles and long ago took his leave from New York, "I was at home in Maryland, no work, nothing going on. I told Lori, 'We gotta toughen up. We can fold, or we can lean on each other and play the cards that were dealt us.' "Then J.J. called about 'Lost.' I said, 'I'll take it' - not a strong negotiation stance."

On "Lost," O'Quinn joined an enormous cast of featured regulars who also include Matthew Fox (as a sexy doctor), Evangeline Lilly (a dishy jailbird), Dominic Monaghan (a rock-star junkie), Jorge Garcia (a fat guy who says "Dude" a lot), Naveen Andrews (a terrorist?) and eight others. In all, there are supposedly 48 refugees trying to gain rescue and, in the meantime, forge some semblance of a civilized community.

Good luck. Desperation and conflict keep these castaways at odds. Spectral beasts and island cohabitants stalk them. And everyone, it seems, has secrets - secrets to which even the actors aren't privy until each script arrives.

The series is filmed on Oahu, with five or six of each episode's eight shooting days spent outdoors, often at the beach location on the island's north shore. The pilot was shot there a year ago. Then filming resumed July 15, which happened to be O'Quinn's 52nd birthday.

Revealing his bent for numerology, O'Quinn notes that five and two equal seven, and that July is the seventh month, then reels off other instances of seven looming large in his life. "I told Lori, 'Things are at a crossroads. And if "Lost" isn't the crossroads, it's the bridge to the other side.' I believe in fate."

Fate has been mighty good to "Lost" so far. But even a believer like O'Quinn has kept his head: "I'm always being the old warrior, telling everybody, 'Don't buy a house. Let's be patient and see how it goes.' "

On the most recent "Lost," Locke declared that "Everyone gets a new life on this island." And that maybe includes the actor who plays him, a long-familiar face who might at last be a star. "It would be nice to think about more doors opening, to be able to pick and choose roles," O'Quinn freely admits. "But I'm not anxious to go anywhere else right now. I could do this for a while."

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Lost Boy - Terry O'Quinn on Season One DVD

Terry O'Quinn on the Complete First Season DVD For Lost:

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Some of you may find this interesting, but particularly, I know that Ranster will.

My daughter while glancing through one of her psychology textbooks pointed out to me that there was a John Locke quoted in her book: [W.J. and J.J Jordaan (1989) Man in Context]

He was a British Philosopher (1632-1704) and he held that all knowledge is acquired through the senses and experiences. There are no inherent ideas or notions. Man is at birth a tabula rasa (a clean slate) on which experiences write his history.

He believed that the only source of true knowledge about the world is to be found in what is conveyed to us by the senses.

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Flo ~ Yes, this was covered... but it's interesting to re-read!! Hopefully this week will slow down a bit for me at work, so I can do some reading up on our characters (old and new) and the meaning of their names... remember the producers said nobody's names are random.

Locke is still my favorite character. My opinion shifts just about every week -- right now I'm feeling he's bad, but he will probably be good next week :D

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Thanks Raydog.

Sorry about that!

I did not know that it was already covered!

I did look around first but I found nothing regarding that.

It must have been some time ago, before I became a member...

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Locke is still my favorite character. My opinion shifts just about every week -- right now I'm feeling he's bad, but he will probably be good next week :D

I'm with you on your thoughts on Locke, however, my gut says that no one is totally bad (black) or good (white), rather all the survivors are a nice shade of grey- some slowly becoming a little more black in tone and some a little more white in color. :huh: I just think it is so much more interesting to show the virtues AND faults of each person...and keeps us on our toes and at the edge of our seats too!

And it probably depends on much their minds are messed with by the others/hanso foundation/machine monster/et al. B)

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Thanks Raydog.

Sorry about that!

I did not know that it was already covered!

I did look around first but I found nothing regarding that.

It must have been some time ago, before I became a member...

No worries!!

I'm excited... today looks to be a slow day (work-wise) :D

kayo - you make a good point about shades of gray (or grEy, as you say!) :D I'm hoping to get some research done - maybe get on over to the official (abc) bulletin board and maybe even check out some of the ancillary "official" sites like the hanso foundation and I know there are a few more that I haven't even bookmarket yet.

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Is it me or is Locke becoming more and more stand-offish and almost mean?

In last night's episode, when Charlie mentioned Kate seeing a black horse, Locke's expression was more that of cautious information gathering rather than concern for Kate, Charlie or the lot.

I can't help but think the introduction of Mr Eko has somehow negatively effected (affected ?) Locke.

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Is it me or is Locke becoming more and more stand-offish and almost mean?

In last night's episode, when Charlie mentioned Kate seeing a black horse, Locke's expression was more that of cautious information gathering rather than concern for Kate, Charlie or the lot.

I can't help but think the introduction of Mr Eko has somehow negatively effected (affected ?) Locke.

When e'er locke acts odd(alot) I remember he thought wha' he saw (creature?) was beautiful...wha's he know the rest doona know anyways hmmmmmm?

:unsure:

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Terry O'Quinn is scheduled for Regis & Kelly on Monday, 15th May.

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Courtesy of: TV GUIDE, INTERVIEWS & FEATURES

Feeling Lost? Here's Our Guide to John Locke

by Nina H

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Locke is one of my favorite TV characters of all time. I love the complexity of his character, how he's so unsure of himself and so sure of himself at the same time. I am only on season 2 though because I just discovered Lost this month. Trying to catch up without ruining it for myself.

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