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"The 70's House


nawlinsgal
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I looked around and didnt' see this posted anywhere..but if it happens to be a double...sorry and just move or delete

I read abot this in my TV Focus this morning and had to go to the site and find an article for you all to read. This show sounds like it will be hilarious, I love a good laugh...everytime music comes across the speaker they have to stop and drop everything they are doing..And Do The Hustle...lmao...then they have to go to a hip-hop club and dance disco...and not tell anyone why they are doing it, some of the girls and I'm sure some guys said they were humiliated...anyway here one of the articles...Tuesday night MTV at 9:30pm Central time...I cant' wait...

BY KEVIN McDONOUGH

Kevin McDonough is a freelance writer

July 3, 2005

We've all seen this "reality" before. Or have we? Twelve photogenic young people arrive at a designated location ready to outwit and outlast. But this time, their "real" world consists of a humble split-level ranch with a shagadelic interior decor.

Bert (Bil Dwyer), dressed for an ancient episode of "Let's Make a Deal," greets them at the door, brandishing a clunky microphone and shouting each guest's name and astrological birth sign. Jaws drop and eyes bulge as the unsuspecting players make their way into the sunken living room. Welcome to "The '70s House" (debuting Tuesday at 10:30 p.m.), MTV's new experiment in mind games and competitive cohabitation.

Expecting to appear on "The Real World," or "Road Rules," the kids are shocked to discover that they must immerse themselves in the music, food and fads of 30 years ago. They must study '70s history and lore, and, worse, they must get up and dance the Hustle every time the song blares from speakers placed throughout the house. But before they do, their host, Dawn (Natasha Leggero), demands that they divest themselves of their cell phones, PDAs, iPods and other technical devices from a time now referred to as "the 2000s."

The makers of "The '70s House" felt that this technological deprivation would be at least half the joke. According to MTV senior vice president Jessica Samet, the producers knew "it would be funny to watch kids all born in the 1980s having to live in the '70s and having to live without all of the things they are used to."

While one contestant, Andrew, 19, contends that he had "a blast" in the house, he was challenged by his parents' technology. He'd seen a rotary phone only once, "as a prop in a play I was in." Relying on the single phone "was really bad. ... I couldn't call my mom if I was having a bad day in the '70s." And to make matters worse, "the girls seemed to figure out right away, and they were always on it."

According to Samet, the contestants had phone problems beyond the slowness of the rotary dial. They had a hard time calling their friends because "all of their numbers are stored in their cell phones."

Andrew found phonographs equally mysterious. "I had no idea what I was doing. Every time I would turn a little knob, ... [the needle] would go up and go back down." And having grown used to his iPod, he couldn't acclimate to the more leisurely pace of spinning platters. "We're from the microwave generation. We want things right away. We don't want to wait around until the needle settles."

While he'll never become a vinyl fan, Andrew left "The '70s House" with an appreciation for what he now considers "the great music of the 1970s" and an increased disdain for contemporary artists such as Britney Spears. The first thing he bought after returning to 2005 was a Simon and Garfunkel CD.

But the show is not only about "Feelin' Groovy." Tension arrives in the form of competitions and weekly eliminations. The voice of a man named Oscar announces each new challenge via a vintage speakerphone. Think Charlie of "Charlie's Angels." In episode one, the housemates are required to compete in a basketball game, dressed in short shorts, clunky sneakers, headbands and other regalia out of the old American Basketball Association, even using its tricolor ball. At the last minute they discover they'll be playing in front of a contemporary high school crowd, that jeers at the outlandish outfits.

In a future episode, the housemates take disco dancing lessons from Deney Terrio, choreographer for "Saturday Night Fever," only to find that their dance competition takes place at a hip-hop club, where their prairie dresses and one-piece jumpsuits raise eyebrows, to say the least.

The contestants also compete in trivia contests modeled on '70s game shows and presided over by Bert and Dawn. A veteran of the spoof show "Joe Schmo II" and a guest star on an upcoming episode of "Reno 911," Leggero plays Dawn with mellow aplomb. "For Dawn," Leggero says, "everything is chill ... nothing is going to get you down."

But while Dawn is always having a nice day, Samet is bummed out by the players' scant knowledge of '70s history. "They are totally clueless. They thought the [iranian] hostage crisis took place in Canada. They think America's bicentennial was in 1972 and that Eisenhower was president during the '70s." Their lack of knowledge even extended to one of the most popular tunes of the classic-rock era. In a fill-in-the blank test, they were asked to complete the song title, "Stairway to ____." "Oddly enough, one of them thought the answer was 'Miami,'" Samet observes ruefully. "We had a lot of moments."

Despite such "setbacks," Leggero found the atmosphere upbeat. "I was prepared for them to think the '70s were gross. But every time we threw something at them, they all got excited."

Just don't ask about the food. One female housemate complained that she gained 10 pounds from the steady diet of Swanson's frozen dinners. And "they complained that it took 25 minutes to cook the dinners because there were no microwaves," Samet says.

But there were some upsides to the technological downgrade. According to Samet, the lack of gadgetry forced house members to "sit around and talk and read magazines and books, and do things that they were not used to doing."

The MTV executive seemed genuinely surprised by how much the contestants liked wearing polyester outfits from the Ford and Carter years. "We looked for the worst clothes of the 70s ... the worst," Samet says.

But don't tell that to Andrew. Now that he's back in the present, his future might entail a wilder wardrobe and wider collars. "I would love to wear leisure suits around all of the time," says Andrew, birth sign Cancer. "I think they look pimp."

:'( Im waiting....i can't wait...If it's half as good as the write up I read in TV Focus it will be good..my tv focus also said they have bad word comps...like the first week someone says awesome and another says Botox..so they have to compete playing the game operation...lol..

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I'm looking forward to this one. Definetely Real World in the 70's.

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This show was really dorky. I thought the lingo was funny. When they said that they can't have any modern gadgets they included microwave ovens. I was born in 1975 and we've had a microwave since I can remember, so I think they got that wrong. It was slow hopefully it will pick up.

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This show was really dorky. I thought the lingo was funny. When they said that they can't have any modern gadgets they included microwave ovens. I was born in 1975 and we've had a microwave since I can remember' date=' so I think they got that wrong. It was slow hopefully it will pick up.

[b']I was in college in 1976 and not a microwave anywhere except the one in the large cafeteria for cafeteria workers. Although microwaves were around, they were too cost prohibitive for everyone to have them like they are today. We used to heat things up with a metal coil attached to an electrical cord that you would plug into a wall outlet. We also had a small coffee pot-like device that plugged directly into the wall to heat things up in the dorm. The more advanced students had hot plates.

We also did not have computers. We thought we were advanced if we had electric typewriters. And forget about CDs, we were still in the vinyl age with a must have turntable. VCRs . . . I don't think so. Again, too costly and there was that whole Beta versus VHS battle.

The thing I hated the most in the 70s was the fashion. Platform shoes so high you would often twist your ankle by falling off your own heel. Huge drop earrings made of plastic/lucite balls hanging off of chains that not only weighed a ton on your ears but if you got carried away shaking your head, you could knock yourself out! And everyone had a fro of some kind . . . men and women of all colors worked those picks to get maximum hair volume.

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Guest ranster627

I am so with you there ... microwaves were so expensive and really a rarity ... even colour TV's were just coming down in price ... I can't remember when, but my first VCR was $2,500 that I had to finance and I was three years ahead of the trend ...

Now I just clunk along and wait a few years ... I am ranster and I still have an 8 Track Player and 8 Tracks too ... :oops:

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Well I spoke with my mother and sure enough we had a microwave in the 70's. In fact she said a lot of people she knew had them too. She said it was the size of a 27" TV. So I guess the show is definitely wrong on that point.

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Well I spoke with my mother and sure enough we had a microwave in the 70's. In fact she said a lot of people she knew had them too. She said it was the size of a 27" TV. So I guess the show is definitely wrong on that point.

Well, I'm glad your family could afford one and apparently your neighbors could as well but as I stated before, microwaves were NOT the norm in the 70s. I didn't know anyone who had microwaves until the prices came down for the average consumer. AND, there were some that were still skeptical about the "fast" cooking. I went online and did a little research and found this statistic to back up MTV's ban on microwaves:

"In 1976, the microwave oven was reported in 17% of all homes in Japan compared with 4% of the homes in the United States the same year."

I don't consider 4% a majority by any means. No one said they didn't exist but it just wasn't the norm because of affordability and size concerns. They were huge and not portable like today's models. I was in my 20s in the 1970s and I remember the lack of options in college and my first apartments. The microwave was, however, the fastest growing appliance in the American technology so it was probably only a few years later that the number of households jumped into larger percentages. It was the same with touch tone phones. They were around but it took a long time to phase out dial phones from the America scene.

I think MTV is trying to go with the average American consumer in the 70s and not the smaller percentage. So probably between your plethora of microwaves and most peoples lack of nuclear technology probably lies the truth so just because it wasn't our experience doesn't make MTV wrong. They might just be basing their house rules on research of the average person. And, after all, reality television is all about "good TV" so I'm sure they put as many hardships on the household to create a more dramatic effect.

You're not alone in criticizing the show though. Critics, as well as many message boards, have reported the show to be lacking in production value. Opinions vary between criticism of the cast for being either too "Hollywood" or too boring. I suspect your assessment of the show is shared by a lot of people which time will tell when the ratings come out. I wouldn't be surprised if this is a one season show. Funny, how some shows just click with the television audience while others just fall flat on their face. It'll be interesting to see where this show falls on that barometer. StephenV, keep us posted! Thanks!

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hs8_qt just a quick note. i did some research about microwaves and by 1975 microwaves were outselling gas ranges. So I wouldn't say it was a small percent. The site if you want to read is www.thecookinginn.com/tcirecipes/microwavehist.html it will give you the complete history. Just wanted to answer so people think we were an elitist family with the US's first microwave in the 70's. Nuff said from me about that subject.

The show was a little boring and cheesy like I said but I want to see if it picks up..besides when they have to do "the hustle" that was hilarious. Was that really a dance?

Also slowpoke I'm sure it will repeat this weekend. MTV always repeats it shows all weekend.

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Guest ranster627

I take back my microwave thing ... as I really don't know as my mother reminded me we were "po folk" at that time! sorry for any confusion ...

MTV often reruns the whole thing after a first run ...

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h8s_just a quick note. i did some research about microwaves and by 1975 microwaves were outselling gas ranges. So I wouldn't say it was a small percent. The site if you want to read is www.thecookinginn.com/tcirecipes/microwavehist.html it will give you the complete history. Just wanted to answer so people think we were an elitist family with the US's first microwave in the 70's. Nuff said from me about that subject.

StephenV_just a quick note. Funny thing' date=' I also did my research and we have the same source and the same article. However, you failed to mention the 4% fact in that article. Outselling doesn't necessarily mean the majority of American households had them but it does infer it was on its way. I never called your family elitest. I inferred your family as lucky to be part of the 4%. And, yes, I call 4% a VERY small percentage.

The show was a little boring and cheesy like I said but I want to see if it picks up..besides when they have to do "the hustle" that was hilarious. Was that really a dance?

Yes, Steven . . . unfortunately and sadly, that was one of the MOST popular dances. Sad, isn't it? LOL. The Bump was the other big dance craze. I can't tell you how silly we all looked practicing the Bump against anything that didn't move . . . walls, cars, etc. The fashions were ridiculous and not very forgiving on the dance floor either. Polyester does not breathe so you can imagine the disco floor reeking of perspiration and Jovan Musk!

Again, please keep us posted on the pace of the show. If it doesn't hold your interest, I doubt it's going to last. You are in total sync with the critics on the show and most of the reality programming web sites who have reviewed the new show.

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That 4% is people doing cooking in microwaves not the number in US homes. By 1976 50 million people owned microwaves. That's a huge number.

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That 4% is people doing cooking in microwaves not the number in US homes. By 1976 50 million people owned microwaves. That's a huge number.

Before this gets out of hand and people get the wrong idea, StephenV and I are just having a civilized conversation and we've agreed to disagree on the interpretation of the article. We have different impressions on what is the "norm" and that's okay! Thanks StephenV for a lively conversation and debate! Please keep us posted on your review of the show. I will be very interested in hearing if the pace picks up. I hope the show won't bring back those dastardly fashions though. Your pores will thank me if they ever have to wear those synthetic fabrics! LOL!

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All's cool and I hope more people watch this show and maybe we can have more 70's discussion about this odd show.

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Guest ranster627
You are in total sync with the critics on the show and most of the reality programming web sites who have reviewed the new show.

Well speaking for myself, I was enjoying the debate and want it to keep going, I asked my critique question becasue of this ... I was hoping people would share them if they are out there ... :wink:

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Here's one Ranster627..a guy was put up for eviction from the 70's house beacuse he used the word "awesome" and was told that was 80's lingo. My older brother who was a teenager in the 70's told me that was a phrase from late 70's surfer and skateboarding groups in California. I know the phrase became popular by the character Jeff Spicoli from that movie I can't remeber the name of. Any comments from you 70's folks?

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Here's one Ranster627..a guy was put up for eviction from the 70's house beacuse he used the word "awesome" and was told that was 80's lingo. My older brother who was a teenager in the 70's told me that was a phrase from late 70's surfer and skateboarding groups in California. I know the phrase became popular by the character Jeff Spicoli from that movie I can't remeber the name of. Any comments from you 70's folks?

The movie title you're looking for is "Fast Times at Ridgemont High" from 1982. As for the word "awesome" . . . I think that word has been around for a long time so not sure if any decade can lay claim to it. Now you've given me something new to research tonight! :lol: I'll have to get back to you on this one. Thanks StephenV for another thought-provoking topic for discussion.

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OK...I just watched this show and I think it's GROOVY!

Hey...I was a kid in the 70's and all I wanted to do was be a big person and go to the discoteques, meet Steve Rubell and party in platform shoes.

I have to say.... I would definitely travel back in time if I could be twenty something in that era!

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Jackie - I would have been glad to have switched places with you! LOL! I WAS 20-something in the 70s and could have done without the fashion and some of the music. But looking back, I have to admit it was an exciting time and one filled with a lot of great memories so I guess I can't begrudge it much. Truth be told, I had a really great time in my college years between protesting for significant social change and partying my fool head off! What happens in the 70s . . . stays in the 70s. As Brittany Murphy (Elisabeth Burrows) said in "Don't Say A Word" . . . "I'll never tell!" LOL!

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I was born in 1976 and know my grandmother had a fairly large microwave for about as ling as I can remember, and it had a touch pad already. Now, that may have been early 80's, but the touch pad was basically the same used today.

Just because you don't have a microwave in a dorm(In the mid-90's I remember very few having a microwave in their rooms) doesn't mean they were not rapidly increasing in the home.

On the other hand, some can afford technology very early, for instance Elvis had remote control TVs and car phones in the 60's...

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Okay, to beat the proverbial dead horse, just because your grandmother had a microwave doesn't mean that every home had them either. I lived in metropolitan Chicago and no one I knew had microwaves until the early 80s. I say that as MY experience and not everyone elses. I find it ironic that we're hearing from people born in the mid-70s instead of people who were 20-something themselves in the 70s. Like StephenV and I have agreed to disagree, can we put to rest this senseless debate. Microwaves were around and some households could afford them while others could not. MTV obviously decided to go with the households that couldn't. As my new buddy, StephenV would say, 'nuff said'.

Now, StephenV opened up a new topic regarding the word 'awesome' and I have to admit I haven't done my homework on the word as promised. Sorry StephenV. I'll get right on it. I called my friends for lingo refreshing and here's a partial list with a few of the words or phrases they remembered (have to admit I remember a few better than others but it WAS the 70s LOL) . . . Get on with your bad self! :wink:

Things I Barely Recall from the 70s

Groovy

Heavy

Far Out

Bummer

Tubular

Psychodelic

Keep on Truckin'

What It Was, What It Is, What It Will Be

chill pill

what's happening?

what up?

get down

boogie down

Stop dipping in my Kool-aid

bogart

Be There Or Be Square!

Peace, Love and Dope!

Down with it

doobie

Outta Sight

nifty

dorky

Right on!

Sit on it!

jive talkin'

Smell 'ya later

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