Jump to content

Invasion (New Sci-Fi Series)


Jem
 Share

Recommended Posts

  • Replies 55
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • 4 weeks later...

Courtesy of: TV GUIDE, THE WATERCOOLER

Invasion

Well, so much for my "peaceful takeover" theory. And how! It sure was great to see this show come back from hiatus in full force. First, we got the alien "support group" really supporting some guy to the ground... and the emergency room. Then Mariel supported my conclusion that she is not hot by getting all crazy mad and vein-y and fang-y at Russ. Then Russ and Uncle Dave supported the theory that these are aliens, they are trying to invade, this show has a point, and we're getting closer to it. Somehow, without my noticing, this show came back and answered the perfect number of questions, evolved into a mature sci-fi intrigue magnet, and managed to retain its charming creepiness. Wait, I was supposed to be talking about force, not support. Well, what the hell, I support this show now, and I used to be forced to watch it.

Come on, we still have our unanswered questions, creepy locked doors, one-armed guys and naked baths with hot blonde girls (oh, my god). But, um, now there's a more meaningful air to the show, like they're getting to something. I felt like I saw just enough of every character. I care about characters whose names I didn't previously know. Maybe they found their stride, or maybe that was just a really good episode. We had some strong adult themes, some cool fossils, girls in bikinis, good science, moral battles, some scripture, porn sound bytes

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Courtesy of: TV GUIDE, ASK MATT

Question: So what's the deal with Invasion and its future? I know it's returning from hiatus, but how many more episodes will air this season? And what's its prognosis for renewal, given how the rest of ABC's plate is already so full with higher-rated hits?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Courtesy of: TV GUIDE, THE WATERCOOLER

Invasion

Um, remember when the creepy alien-leader sheriff brought the kids back from whatever cabin in the woods he took them to, where he gave them presents and dragged big duffel bags around and rode off on a boat with reflective safety sheriff stickers on it, at all hours of the night, and then two of the kids' real parents were all like "Thanks for not murdering the kids" and then we saw beach scenes from Abercrombie Island?

Yeah, this show was all over the place. And a little bit stale.

There's some locked door that's been teasing us for a few episodes now. Come on.

There's something going on with the children, and who "has" them. I mean...

There are religious undertones, only not so "under." OK.

There are literary references. Fine.

There are conspiracy theories. Done.

There are good-looking people on beaches. Oh, really?

Somebody knows more than everybody else and has an agenda. You don't say.

So that's the part that threw me. If you want to hide something, be sure to put it in a hockey bag and drag it out of your car late at night, past your boat dock and all the windows in the house, into your bedroom, and then back out to your boat later that night. Then start the engine and get to transporting it to an island of shirtless Old Navy commercial rejects.

Bitter? A little. What's that called when race cars get real close to the guy in front and use less gas? Drafting or something? Invasion is totally doing that to Lost. And that's all I have to say about that... until next week.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Courtesy of: TV GUIDE, ASK MATT

Question: I finally caught up on my old tapes of Invasion, which meant three hours over the last couple of days. Somehow the time off made me forget how absolutely captivating this show is. The acting is great, the production quality high, and the story original (in a genre that often lacks originality). So is it wrong that I want the series to end? That is, I want it to end the right way, with some kind of resolution. Even if it is renewed, it isn't the kind of show that will pick up viewers in year 2. I'd love to see Invasion end with a two-hour season finale that wraps everything up, because maybe more than any other show, I can't bear the thought of seeing this show disappear without resolution. So, realistically, what are the chances that, if it's not renewed, the writers will have time to do the right thing and pen a fair conclusion to the best miniseries ever?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Courtesy of: SCI-FI WIRE

ABC Sticks With Invasion

12:00 AM, 23-JANUARY-06

Stephen McPherson, president, ABC Entertainment, told reporters that the network's SF series Invasion, created by Shaun Cassidy, isn't going away. Just yet.

"Invasion, you know, is a show that I think is doing the best work it's ever done. It is a great, great television show," McPherson said in a news conference at the Television Critics Association's winter press tour in Pasadena, Calif., on Jan. 21. McPherson expressed confidence in the show, about alien influences in a small Florida town in the wake of a disastrous hurricane, despite the series' lackluster ratings in the wake of its Wednesday-night lead-in, the megahit Lost.

For his part, Invasion executive producer Cassidy told SCI FI Wire that he thinks ABC will stay with the show. "I'm cautiously optimistic that they'll recognize the incredible quality of our program," he said in an interview, with tongue slightly in cheek. "I think they do, actually. My theory about our timeslot is that ... following Lost has been a good-news, bad-news proposition for us. And I wouldn't have said this six months ago, because I would have thought, 'Well, it's fantastic. What could be bad?' Here's what I think could be bad: You have a very intelligent, dense, novel-like show in Lost. I would venture to say in all humility our show is very similar in that sense. I think it requires a great deal of commitment on the part of any audience member to sit for two and sometimes three hours, because they run Lost at 8 often. Writers on my own staff say to me, when I ask on Thursday morning, 'Did you see the show last night?' 'Well, no, because I watched Lost and then I was so tired. I TiVo'd it.' L.A. Weekly said we're the number-one TiVo show in America, and I think it might be true. ... I think our show might actually benefit from being on a different night."

As to whether ABC might actually consider moving Invasion, Cassidy added: "They talked to me about moving after we premiered. Not like, 'We're going to move you.' But the conversation has always been, 'Is this a good thing or a bad thing?' Nobody was really sure."

In another context, McPherson said: "It may be the reality that what's compatible with Lost is a lighter viewing experience, either before it or after it." Invasion airs Wednesdays at 10 p.m. ET/PT.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Did anyone else think it kind of funny and a little odd that the end of last week's LOST episode had Jack asking Ana Lucia about how to build an army, and the ending of Invasion's episode on the same night showed the people/creatures/whatever building their own "sheriff's" army? :blink:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Courtesy of: TV GUIDE, THE WATERCOOLER

Invasion

Holy. Rip. Off. Did you see... I can't believe... flashbacks... planes crashing... suspense... character development... I can't even think of any smart-ass remarks. I may have a new disease, and I'm calling it "Writer's Blah." In essence, it means I'm so intent on comparing this show to Lost that I can't. All I can do is give props. So what, if it's going with what works? It may be riding coattails, drafting or just copying. Either way, it's smart and has me glued to my seat.

You know how there's always some jerk in your office who thinks he knows everything, and is usually right? Don't worry, he just got served. This new species of drama that ABC is serving up has me

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A little backstage information and humor. :)

................................................................................

..

Courtesy of: ZAP2IT

An 'Invasion' Hurricane Hits Burbank

By Kate O'Hare

Sunday, January 29, 2006

12:00 AM PT

lisasheridan_eddiecibrian_invasion_240.j

In the Wednesday ABC freshman drama "Invasion," the small town of Homestead, Fla., struggles to recover from a devastating hurricane while also coping with an apparent influx of strange creatures in the water and strange behavior among its citizens.

Series creator Shaun Cassidy knows a bit about Homestead, since his wife's family still lives there, so you might expect a certain level of authenticity. What you might not expect is a convincing slice of the South Florida Everglades smack in the middle of the Warner Bros. back lot in Burbank, Calif., just a short golf-cart ride from Cassidy's production offices.

The show also films on location in Fillmore, Calif., and other surrounding areas.

"This is our pond," Cassidy says, standing next to a good-sized, murky body of water surrounded by trees and bordered by a large blue-screen canopy. "This is our window to the Everglades. It's about four feet deep. The blue screen comes and goes, depending on what we're doing.

"This pond was here. We added all the saw grass, and we dressed it with a lot of specific foliage to Florida. But I think it was used in 'Fantasy Island.' They shot a lot of 'Adaptation' here and 'The Last Samurai.'"

The dirt road that runs by the pond is rutted and muddy -- the result of cinematic "rain" the night before -- and Cassidy says that some of the huge trees alongside it long predate "Invasion."

"This is a banyan tree," he says. "This was here. We didn't put this big tree in. That's a magnolia, and that's a parking lot. Can you see it through there, through the painted screen?"

Pointing at another painted backdrop, he says, "It's shielding a fence leading out to Warner Bros. Records, where I made records when I was a kid. Right there. That's where I used to go all the time. It's really weird."

The eldest son of Jack Cassidy and Shirley Jones, and half brother to David Cassidy, Shaun Cassidy had a recording career as a teenager, including the hit 1977 single "Da Do Ron Ron," and later segued into acting and then writing and producing. By the '90s, he was creating such TV shows as "American Gothic" and "Roar."

Because of his parentage, Cassidy has a lifelong history in show business.

"My first memory of being on any lot was this lot," he says, "when my mother was doing 'The Music Man.' I was, like, 5 years old, and I was riding my bike around with Ronny Howard, who was 8 or 9 years old."

Adjacent to the pond is the field office of park ranger Russell Varon (Eddie Cibrian). Not far away, nestled amid more trees and greenery, is the rustic, storm-battered house Russell shares with his children -- teenage Jesse (Evan Peters) and little Rose (Ariel Gade) -- and his pregnant second wife, TV reporter Larkin Groves (Lisa Sheridan).

Russell's first wife, Dr. Mariel Underlay (Kari Matchett), lives with her second husband, Sheriff Tom Underlay (William Fichtner), and his teenage daughter, Kira (Alexis Dziena), in an expensive subdivision that suffered no hurricane damage -- but that's later in the tour.

On the way to Russell's house, chain saws drown out conversation as a large tree is cut into pieces, and Cassidy has to hop out of the golf cart to move aside branches.

"By the way," he says, "what they're doing here -- we constantly have to make hurricane debris."

A later encounter with producer Timothy Marx, who's walking a new director around the set, reveals the tree in question was actually 15 years old and rotted out and fell of its own accord.

Next to the house is a barn occupied by Russell's brother-in-law, conspiracy theorist Dave Groves (Tyler Labine), who rightly suspects that all is not well with the Underlays.

"It's an indoor-outdoor set," Cassidy says. "You never see, on television, people playing a scene inside and walking outside in one shot. You usually have to cut, because it's usually on a soundstage.

"The benefit is, we're playing the nature and bringing it in, but the downside is real weather is going to affect us and real sound. When it's raining on the roof, you hear it."

The house itself is roughly thrown together -- Cassidy explains that Russell built it from a dilapidated shell for Mariel when she was pregnant with Rose -- and much the worse for wear after the hurricane. There are replacement shingles on the roof, missing windows and a lot of dirt tracked everywhere. But still it has charm.

"Our guys did this in three weeks," he says. "There was nothing here. You're seeing it more cleaned up than it was. This has been a slow recovery. This is an old house, and Russell added onto it.

"What's so great, you can shoot through windows to real outdoors. You can walk and talk, go into the bedroom, through the living room, out into the yard, over to Dave's barn, get into a car and leave, all in one shot."

There's also a treehouse Russell built for Rose, from which one could see, as Cassidy says, "probably Burbank."

In sharp contrast is the Underlay McMansion, built on a soundstage that Cassidy says once was home to "Casablanca," "A Streetcar Named Desire" and "East of Eden."

It's an angular, cold house painted in dull colors. "This was the model for the neighborhood," Cassidy says, "and Underlay said, 'I'll take it,' and surprised Mariel with all the furniture."

As to the possibility of another storm before the end of the season, Cassidy says, "There may be, but in our universe, it's not so much about the hurricane as what comes in with the hurricane."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Courtesy of: TV GUIDE, THE WATERCOOLER

Invasion

I was so amped for this, you guys. Probably the most cryptic of the episodes. Sure we know everything now, but we so don't. This is why the people whose names we do not speak are worthy of us speaking their names. That's right, whoever they are, I applaud their storytelling, and I do that whistle thing with my fingers when they mix the story up to save money and take vacations and let us simmer in the quandary they have left us in. I mean, these reruns give us time to reflect, to hear that line we missed, to realize the hidden agendas, to laugh at what they think we don't already know, or... don't know.

Clearly I've been through a hurricane recently. This is nonsense. Reruns suck, but perhaps they do serve a higher purpose. When all these series come out on DVD, I think they should have some sort of "watch-protect," where you have to wait a week between watching episodes. Then, sometimes a disc will get stuck and force you to watch an old episode, because if there's one thing tonight's episode taught me, it's that you missed something in that old episode. And you want to see it. You want to go watch all the other episodes again. You want to figure it out. Well, you won't. Not until they want you to.

Tonight's highlights:

Jesse to bleeding Mariel: "Oh my god. Whu... what is wrong with you?"

"Larkin to Russ, come in Russ": When asked by her stepdaughter, Rose, why they needed another baby, Larkin Nextels Russ at work to have him answer. Boo.

Um, I forgot Mariel was totally dead.

That girl Christina was a freak.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Courtesy of: TV GUIDE, THE WATERCOOLER

Invasion

Tonight's show succeeded in spooking me, as it was supposed to. I got that same tense feeling I had from watching raptors and aliens stalk humans in Jurassic Park and War of the Worlds. But as Dave was creeping around his house following the intruder's muddy trail, I envisioned Swamp Thing jumping out of the shadows and my tension subsided considerably. Instead, Dave came face to face with his half-formed, open-pustule-ridden, alien-clone self who'd been stealing Dave's personal items and living in a van down by the river. OK, it wasn't a van. To Larkin I say, this is what you get for leaving all your doors open when you suspect alien prowlers. Are we sure Larkin's not carrying a hybrid child? I swear that baby bump was a concave belly a few days ago. The clone certainly was drawn to her, but then nothing says Host Body like a pregnant woman. Good thing Dave shot it. This begs the question: Does killing one's own clone qualify as suicide? I suppose the answer to that depends on whether or not the clone stays dead. We know from Lewis' and Underlay's regenerations that death is a slippery slope with these "people," so Russ and Dave dumping the clone in the water doesn't assure me that we've seen the last of him. Though this episode had far too little Mariel, Kira's increasing screen time is proving that she's more than just teenage eye candy. I'm liking her relationship with Lewis, who, though childlike in a Michael Jackson way, still doesn't have me 100 percent convinced that there was no Jesus Juice in their shared tent. Underlay will deal with that situation once he's avenged his near-fatal shooting, and since we now know that it wasn't the mysterious Zura who pulled the trigger, then it had to be the priest! Why didn't I think of that? Because I was too busy thinking about this: If Zura and Underlay are partners building their own hybrid army, can Russ and Dave trust anything that this ex-CIA dude has told them? Now that gives me chills.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...

Courtesy of: TV GUIDE, THE WATERCOOLER

Um, wow. Did I miss an episode, or a whole season? Whatever it was, I feel like I just watched a film, and the DVD was all scratched and kept jumping all over the place, but I somehow think I saw the whole thing. Kind of like those migrant workers emerging slowly from the swamps, with their eerie calm, mustaches and countenances that put the fear of Chuck Norris in us all. They knew. Knew about us

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

I, for one, hope they bring the show back long enough to have some kind of closure. I hate it when they cancel a show like this and leave those that did watch it hanging :angry:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Cherokee, I saw it. I never really got into this show as much as Threshold. But after that was cancelled I found myself watching. It was a great commercial. I'll be tuning in.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Cherokee, I saw it. I never really got into this show as much as Threshold. But after that was cancelled I found myself watching. It was a great commercial. I'll be tuning in.

I really liked Threshold too. And Surface. I don't think they were given a very good chance to take off.

Can't wait to see Invasion tho. It really is a good sci-fi show.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

heh, heh,...back in business!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Invasion Back With A Bang

Tyler Labine, who plays Dave on ABC's Invasion, told SCI FI Wire that his alien-invasion theorist character will be vindicated when the series returns from its hiatus on April 19 and promised that many questions will be answered on the way to the season-ending cliffhanger. "There's some different sides of Dave coming out here," Labine said in an interview. "Let me just say this: I can only be pushed so far. And I think I finally snap. It's in a very positive way, but I finally take some initiative and grow a bit stronger of a backbone. Let me just say some familial things push me to the edge."

Labine added: "I have a lot of things coming up with Deputy Sirk, the one-armed deputy, and he's very strongly involved in my vindication."

Labine's Dave, who was considered a bit of a conspiracy nut in the beginning of the series, quickly set forth his own theory about the changes in many of the local residents after Hurricane Eve hit the town of Homestead, Fla. Those changes involved so-called "extraterrestrial biological entities," or EBEs.

The series is headed for "the cliffhanger to end all cliffhangers," Labine said. "We are steam-rolling towards the pinnacle of the show. The episodes we've shot have been so unbelievably well-planned throughout the whole season. There's stuff coming up that I didn't even remember that we shot. And it's being tied in so cleverly. ... It was like things that you felt were insignificant or out of place early on, they weren't. They're being tied in all over the place, and we are shooting the finale right now. It's got a really, really huge cliffhanger shocker at the end."

Labine confirmed that it all has to do with another hurricane that's headed back toward Homestead. The new hurricane is "going to be like Eve, only we know what's coming this time, so we expect the s--t is going to hit the fan with this hurricane, and people are preparing for that. We can see hybrids preparing for it. We can see humans preparing for it. And we are preparing in two very different ways."

While there's no word from ABC regarding a possible second season for Invasion, Labine is hopeful. Despite the cliffhanger, he promises a lot of "burning questions" will be answered. The writers have "had to incorporate that into the writing of the last few episodes with just the possibility that, if this is the end, you don't want leave people just, like, more frustrated than entertained." ABC will announce whether or not Invasion will be picked up in mid-May.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ok, I've watched the last two new episodes of Invasion and this is my take:

1. ????

2. This show is most likely at the end of its first and last season

3. It's becoming almost campy what with psycho leader Zura, storehouses filled with water bottles, a one-armed nice guy hybrid, and evil non-hybrid teens to boot!

4. I still find it a tiny bit interesting-interesting enough to keep watching, I guess- but my interest is continuing to steadily diminish.

What do you Invasion watchers think?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Courtesy of: TV GUIDE, ENTERTAINMENT NEWS

Invasion, Chief: ABC Faces Tough Decisions

In an interview with TVGuide.com, Jeff Bader, executive vice president of ABC entertainment programming and scheduling, says that as the May upfronts fast approach, the fates of Invasion and Commander in Chief have yet to be decided. "Since November, Invasion's episodes have been phenomenal," he says, "so that's a discussion more about the potential of the show than the actual [ratings] performance of it." Geena Davis' Commander in Chief is a "harder" decision, Bader tells us, because the network must weigh the pros ("a big star and a great concept") against its ratings struggles. (Chief debuted strongly, but took a major ratings hit over the course of two long hiatuses and show-runner changes.) "We know what we'd be renewing and we like what we'd be renewing, but the question is: Can we get the audience back?"

Posted by Matt Mitovich 04/27/2006 10:13 AM | Permlink | 17 Comments | Report

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks fizzle

10:02 - 11:00 PM

CORRECTION (INVASION) -- "Run and Gun" -- Please note the new run time for this program (formerly it was scheduled from 10:01-11:00 p.m., ET). Parental guideline to come. (HDTV/5.1 AUDIO) (CLOSED-CAPTIONED, with Spanish subtitles via secondary closed captioning)

ABC.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share





Lobby

Lobby

Please enter your display name

×
×
  • Create New...