Jump to content


Big Brother Canada Daily Coverage

Get Smart


  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 Guest_ranster627_*

Guest_ranster627_*
  • Guests

Posted 11 September 2005 - 09:21 PM

FROM TV GUIDE: Ask The Televisionary

Question: My sister just called me at work. She's home sick, watching Get Smart, and wants to know what Agent 99's name was. We know, obviously, that Agent 86's was Maxwell Smart. Was 99's ever stated on the show? I seem to remember Max always calling her 99.

Televisionary: Would you believe it was never revealed? (Sorry, nearly every time I write about Get Smart I have to start off with that famous Maxwell Smart utterance.) Truth is, though, that even Max (Don Adams) knew her only by her CONTROL number despite eventually marrying and fathering a set of twins with his beautiful partner (Barbara Feldon).


In one episode, in which 99 quit CONTROL, she said her name was Susan Hilton. By the end of it, however, she admitted that was a false name. She'd merely sorry, I can't resist pulled a number on us.

#2 ART VAN DELAY

ART VAN DELAY

    Member

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 1,337 posts

Posted 12 September 2005 - 06:43 AM

GET SMART was a great show, is it showing in re-runs anywhere ????

#3 Guest_ranster627_*

Guest_ranster627_*
  • Guests

Posted 12 September 2005 - 10:14 PM

we were getting it on TVLand in Canada for a while, but I'm not sure these days ...

#4 Guest_ranster627_*

Guest_ranster627_*
  • Guests

Posted 26 September 2005 - 06:14 PM

QUOTE(DiamondAuraPayge @ Sep 26 2005, 03:43 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Don Adams of 'Get Smart' dead
'Would you believe?' actor was 82



Monday, September 26, 2005; Posted: 3:00 p.m. EDT (19:00 GMT)

LOS ANGELES, California (AP) -- Don Adams, the wry-voiced comedian who starred as the fumbling secret agent Maxwell Smart in the 1960s television spoof of James Bond movies, "Get Smart," has died. He was 82.
Adams died of a lung infection late Sunday at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, his friend and former agent Bruce Tufeld said Monday, adding the actor broke his hip a year ago and had been in ill health since.
As the inept Agent 86 of the super-secret federal agency CONTROL, Adams captured TV viewers with his antics in combatting the evil agents of KAOS.
When his explanations failed to convince the villains or his boss, he tried another tack: "Would you believe ...?"
It became a national catch phrase.
Smart was also prone to spilling things on the desk or person of The Chief (actor Edward Platt). Smart's apologetic "Sorry about that, chief" also entered the American lexicon.
The spy gadgets, which aped those of the Bond movies, were a popular feature, especially the pre-cell-phone telephone in a shoe.
Smart's beautiful partner, Agent 99, played by Barbara Feldon, was as brainy as he was dense, and a plot romance led to marriage and the birth of twins later in the series.
Adams, who had been under contract to NBC, was lukewarm about doing a spy spoof. When he learned that Mel Brooks and Buck Henry had written the pilot script, he accepted immediately.
"Get Smart" debuted on NBC in September 1965 and scored No. 12 among the season's most-watched series and No. 22 in its second season.
Adams was also the voice of animated characters Tennessee Tuxedo and Inspector Gadget. In the 1970s, Adams hosted "Don Adams' Screen Test," a participatory show in which contestants got to be actors.
"Get Smart" twice won the Emmy for best comedy series with three Emmys for Adams as comedy actor.


Thanks Diamond ... sad day for all!

#5 TV_Paige

TV_Paige

    Forum Host

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 2,696 posts

Posted 29 September 2005 - 01:59 AM



'Get Smart's' Don Adams


Don Adams in his signature role of Maxwell Smart and a more recent
appearance at a 'Get Smart' fan convention.


LOS ANGELES, California - Don Adams once confessed to hating "Get Smart." He was about the only one. The former standup comic who donned a trench coat, launched a catch phrase ("Would you believe...?") and won three Emmys as blundering, yet self-assured spy, Maxwell Smart on the 1960s TV comedy died of a lung infection late Sunday, September 25 at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. He was 82.

Adams' friend and former agent, Bruce Tufeld, confirmed the death on Monday, September 26 adding that the actor had been in poor health since breaking his hip a year earlier. Adams had also been suffering from lymphoma for several years. His death silences his other signature creation: "Inspector Gadget." Adams was the voice behind the blundering, yet fearless crime fighter from the cartoon character's inception in 1983.

It is Maxwell Smart, though, for whom Adams will be first remembered. Adams starred as Smart--Agent 86 to his fellow CONTROL operatives--in the 1965-1970 sitcom. From 1967-69, he earned three straight best comedy series actor Emmys.



Star Don Adams, Executive Producer/Writer Leonard Stein
and Writer/Creator Buck Henry won Emmys for 'Get Smart.'


From the minds of Mel Brooks and Buck Henry, "Get Smart" pitted Smart's CONTROL in a never-ending battle of good versus the evil of KAOS. The show was a Top 25 hit for NBC its first two seasons. The show moved to CBS in 1969, ending its run a year later in true jump-the-shark fashion, with Smart and lady-love, Agent 99 (Barbara Feldon) welcoming the birth of twins.

Adams went on to play Maxwell Smart in the 1980 theatrical bomb, "The Nude Bomb," about a madman whose bomb destroyed people's clothing. He once again donned the trench coat for the 1989 TV-movie, "Get Smart Again" and the short-lived 1995 revival series, also titled, "Get Smart," with Andy Dick as his offspring.

Even as a TV pitchman, for Chief Auto Parts and others, Adams played a Smart-esque character. In 1980, Adams told People he was too Smart for his own good. "Producers felt I couldn't do anything else," he said in the magazine. "Every time I've gotten a script it's another Maxwell Smart-type character." Even worse, Smart wasn't a character of which Adams was particularly fond.



Don Adams Tribute Collage

In People, he admitted he wanted to throw his TV set through a window after watching the first few episodes--"I couldn't stand the laugh track," he said. But in a decade marked by the low-watt humor of "The Beverly Hillbillies" and "I Dream of Jeannie," "Get Smart" was the bright bulb, even if its title character was on the dim side.

Smart was also prone to spilling things on the desk or person of his boss -- the Chief (actor Edward Platt). Smart's apologetic "Sorry about that, chief" also entered the American lexicon. The spy gadgets, which aped those of the Bond movies, were a popular feature, especially the pre-cell-phone telephone in a shoe.

Smart's beautiful partner, Agent 99, played by Barbara Feldon, was as brainy as he was dense, and a plot romance led to marriage and the birth of twins later in the series. Adams, who had been under contract to NBC, was lukewarm about doing a spy spoof. When he learned that Mel Brooks and Buck Henry had written the pilot script, he accepted immediately.



NBC's 'Get Smart' co-starred Don Adams as Maxwell Smart
and Barbara Feldon as Agent 99 in 1965.


"Get Smart" debuted on NBC in September 1965 and scored No. 12 among the season's most-watched series and No. 22 in its second season. "Get Smart" twice won the Emmy for best comedy series with three Emmys for Adams as comedy actor.

CBS picked up "Get Smart" but the ratings fell off as the jokes seemed repetitive, and it was canceled after four seasons. The show lived on in syndication and a cartoon series. In 1995 the Fox network revived the series with Smart as Chief and 99 as a congresswoman. It lasted seven episodes.

Adams never had another showcase to display his comic talent. "It was a special show that became a cult classic of sorts, and I made a lot of money for it," he remarked of "Get Smart" in a 1995 interview. "But it also hindered me career-wise because I was typed. The character was so strong, particularly because of that distinctive voice, that nobody could picture me in any other type of role."

Adams' post-Smart career was marked by numerous cruises on "The Love Boat" (he even boarded the original 1976 TV-movie), and several failed series, including "Don Adams' Screen Test" (1974), in which wannabe actors were given their shots at big-screen stardom.



Don Adams points out two of his alter egos in the art form of the
animated Tennessee Tuxedo and Inspector Gadget.


It would take the debut of the syndicated animated series, "Inspector Gadget" to free Adams somewhat from Agent 86's telephone shoes. Only older audiences knew Adams was riffing on Smart; younger audiences thought he was creating Gadget just for them.

The original Gadget series was produced from 1983-85. It spawned several videos and spinoffs that kept Adams busy through the 1990s. It also inspired a live-action franchise. Adams didn't appear in the movies, but he did lend a voice to the first film, 1999's "Inspector Gadget," starring Matthew Broderick.

Adams was born Donald James Yarmy in New York City on April 13, 1923, Tufeld said, although some sources say 1926 or 1927. The actor's father was a Hungarian Jew who ran a few small restaurants in the Bronx. In a 1959 interview Adams said he never cared about being funny as a kid, "Sometimes I wonder how I got into comedy at all. I did movie star impressions as a kid in high school. Somehow they just got out of hand."

In 1941, Adams dropped out of school to join the Marines. In Guadalcanal, he survived the deadly blackwater fever and was returned to the States to become a drill instructor, acquiring the clipped delivery that served him well as a comedian. After the World War II, he worked in New York as a commercial artist by day, doing standup comedy in clubs at night..



The two sides of Don Adams . . . the serious actor and the clown.

While honing his skills as a comic, he took the surname of his first wife, Adelaide Adams. His career took off in 1954 when his jokes got the applause meter moving on "Arthur Godfrey's Talent Scouts," the "Star Search" of its day. His following grew, and soon he was appearing on "The Ed Sullivan Show" and late-night TV shows.

Adam's sitcom debut came in 1963 with a supporting role in "The Bill Dana Show." Bill Dana, who had helped him develop comedy routines, cast him as his sidekick. That led to the NBC contract and "Get Smart." Adams also made his mark in 1963 as the voice of the titular penguin in the CBS Saturday morning cartoon series, "Tennessee Tuxedo."

Adams married and divorced three times. He had seven children. His daughter, Cecily Adams, a casting director and "Star Trek: Deep Space Nine" recurring guest star, died March 3, 2004 at age 39 of lung cancer. Tufeld said funeral arrangements were incomplete.


#6 ART VAN DELAY

ART VAN DELAY

    Member

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 1,337 posts

Posted 29 September 2005 - 03:21 AM

Don will sadly be missed sad.gif sad.gif sad.gif sad.gif

#7 AarHan3

AarHan3

    Member

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 9 posts

Posted 25 March 2007 - 11:03 AM

Yes, and he still is.

I like the fifth season - the last - on CBS in 1969-70. Its theme music was the highlight of it.

And all 5 original seasons of Get Smart are available on DVD . Click here for the full details.

Attached Files



#8 Barneyfife

Barneyfife

    Member

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 6 posts

Posted 04 April 2008 - 11:36 AM

Get Smart was one of the funniest shows ever made, one of my favorites.

#9 ART VAN DELAY

ART VAN DELAY

    Member

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 1,337 posts

Posted 20 June 2008 - 01:30 PM

hope is the movie good

#10 Allen

Allen

    Member

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 2 posts

Posted 12 May 2009 - 08:30 AM

QUOTE (ranster627 @ Sep 11 2005, 10:21 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
FROM TV GUIDE: Ask The Televisionary

Question: My sister just called me at work. She's home sick, watching Get Smart, and wants to know what Agent 99's name was. We know, obviously, that Agent 86's was Maxwell Smart. Was 99's ever stated on the show? I seem to remember Max always calling her 99.

Televisionary: Would you believe it was never revealed? (Sorry, nearly every time I write about Get Smart I have to start off with that famous Maxwell Smart utterance.) Truth is, though, that even Max (Don Adams) knew her only by her CONTROL number despite eventually marrying and fathering a set of twins with his beautiful partner (Barbara Feldon).


In one episode, in which 99 quit CONTROL, she said her name was Susan Hilton. By the end of it, however, she admitted that was a false name. She'd merely sorry, I can't resist pulled a number on us.



Actually, Max DID know 99's real name. When they got married, the minister said her name as part of the wedding text. At the moment he was to say her name, the camera flashed to Admiral Hargrave, who was laying flat, snoring. So everyone in the church knew 99's name.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users