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House on FOX


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#41
Dade

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Courtesy of: TV GUIDE, INSIDER

Has House Lost Stacy for Good?

by Peter Rubin


Sela Ward and Hugh Laurie, House

The biggest question on Fox's House (Tuesdays at 9 pm/ET) this season hasn't been whether the brilliant Dr. Gregory House (Hugh Laurie) can cure all of those disturbing diseases — it was whether the seemingly unlovable lug would be able to win back his true love, Stacy Warner (Sela Ward), the beautiful — and married — lawyer who returned last season to shake up House's world.
In the Feb. 7 episode, we finally got the answer.

We first met Stacy when her husband needed medical treatment at Princeton-Plainsboro. Ever since then, House has ceaselessly angled to get back in her life — and in the Jan. 10 episode, their chemistry gathered some intense momentum. "We started the whole arc off very subtly — and very unsatisfyingly to some viewers," says executive producer David Shore. "So in the episodes leading up to this one, we brought them to the brink. And then we pushed them right over the cliff."

Stacy helps bring out House's softer side. "I think she's a great match for him and really does serve to bring out pieces of him that you wouldn't be able to see otherwise," Ward says. (Exhibit A: That unexpected hotel-room kiss when the two were stuck in Baltimore.)

Last week, Stacy was forced to make some tough decisions about how far she'll go for love. When she did, House was faced with an even tougher dilemma: Is he willing to change to make her happy?

Shore teased that showdown as "the Casablanca episode," for reasons that became quite clear at the end. And in true House fashion, the doc's motivations will remain somewhat mysterious. "Before Stacy came along," Shore says, "he was this curmudgeon — and he's still a curmudgeon, but he had love, and he sends it out of his life. We're all left wondering why he did it."

As for how House copes with his decision, Shore remains coy: "We're going to deal with the fallout. We're not going to have him pining for the rest of the season, but we want to at least give a nod to the end of the relationship."

But is it really over? As Ward says, Stacy's exit "definitely leaves things open. We talked about it before I left — it's such a tricky story line. I don't know if the producers will do anything; I don't think they know."

Hazy futures aside, there's plenty in upcoming episodes to keep fans glued. As House's season continues, Shore says, "We've got some good stuff happening with Wilson [Robert Sean Leonard] and his [personal life]. That gets a little bit more extreme." Maybe House should find a cure for broken hearts.

#42
Dade

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Courtesy of: TV GUIDE, THE WATERCOOLER

House


Sting advises, "If you love someone, set them free." House's rendition includes banishing all thoughts of the love you threw away, so to distract himself, he:
  • induces migraines in himself and in Comatose Man,
  • destroys his med-school rival's clinical trials,
  • drops acid and
  • entertains a call girl.
All of these, of course, are disguised as clever means to work-related ends. All except the prostitute. Whether House is exposing the bad math of the doctor who got him kicked out of Johns Hopkins 20 years before or waking up his teenage burn patient to take a medical history, it's all about going to the extreme to avoid his own pain. "Nothing can hurt my heart," House says, though we all know that's a lie. Wilson, as ever, is filled with witty comebacks that balance out the caustic doctor's ill mood. Slipping into the light-sensitive doctor's darkened office, Wilson greets him with, "Dr. Jekyll, I presume? They found a half-eaten sheep in the zoo. The police want to ask you a few questions." Even that didn't get a smirk from the heartbroken one. With Stacy gone, House swings dangerously between hurting himself and hurting his patients. Hopefully somebody at Princeton-Plainsboro will catch him before he flies over the edge. Is it wrong to hope his salvation will come in Stacy's surprise return to the show? I don't think so. Fingers crossed. — Rhoda Charles

#43
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House


House's emotional pain is manifesting itself physically. So much so that he's having Cuddy shoot morphine directly into his spine. The fact that the placebo Cuddy gave him relieved his pain proves everyone's point, especially Wilson's, that the increased pain in House's leg is psychological. See? House really does have a heart, and it's aching for Stacy. Since Stacy left, he has been in increasing pain, and it's getting hard to watch. Frankly, I wasn't sure where they were going when he started to undo his pants in Cuddy's office, but like everything else House does, his actions served some nobler purpose. If exposing his atrophied thigh is what it takes to get some relief, then so be it. If only there were some of that purpose in the medical story line. Fifteen-year-old supermodel Alex has a heroin addiction, naturally perky boobs and boy parts. Oh, yeah, and she's seduced her father, but he's only really disturbed by that fact when he realizes that his hot daughter is really a boy. So then it's OK to sleep with your daughter? I wish the writers had shied away from the hermaphrodite shock value and written a decent child-abuse story instead. I wish that Cameron would stop being so predictably annoying. Most of all, I wish for more of Wilson and House playing around in the MRI, "House, this is God." Priceless. — Rhoda Charles

#44
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SPOILER ALERT...HIGHLIGHT TO SEE....DO NOT QUOTE

Courtesy of: SPOILERFIX

12/31 - Episode 2.14 - Sex Kills (fka "Heatless")
[Airing March 7]: House wants to keep a woman who was killed in a car crash alive in order to use her heart for a transplant. Greg Grunberg (ALIAS) guest stars as the woman's husband.

02/16 - Episode 2.15 - Clueless [Airing March 28]: House deals with a woman he thinks is trying to kill her husband.

03/03 - Episode 2.17 - Safe [Airing April 4]: Buffy's Michelle Trachtenberg will guest star as a teenage girl who recently had a heart transplant and needs to be treated by House and his team.

03/03 - Episode 2.18 - All In:
This episode will feature 15-year-old Anne, Chinese, her mother, and 6-year-old Ian.

02/01 - Episode 2.19 - House Vs. God

03/03 - Episode 2.20 - Euphoria:
During this episode, a gangbanger nickanmed Baby Shoes will be chased by police.

#45
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Courtesy of: TV GUIDE, ENTERTAINMENT NEWS

HOUSE CALL:
In what was hardly a surprise announcement in light of its recent American Idol-goosed ratings, Fox's House has been picked up for a third season. In its sophomore run, the series has averaged 14.1 million total viewers and as of late has retained more than 70 percent of the Tuesday-night Idol's audience — most impressive, considering that other Idol lead-outs are lucky to keep half of the viewers. It's enough to make the dour doc sing. Almost.

#46
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House


Yay! House is back from its American Idol-induced hiatus. Don't get me wrong, I'm digging Mandisa and Chris, but it is nice to have the good doctor back in his time slot even if when I turn on the TV, I think I'm watching CSI. Maybe it was the "rape" scene that opened the show or House talking about Australian ants as if he were channeling Grissom. I'll forgive Fox for these mind games because House roared back on the scene with an outstanding episode that was more murder mystery than medical mystery. A loving wife tries to kill her husband by poisoning him with gold dust. House quickly identifies the source of his patient's illness and he pegs it on the wife. His team disagrees with him — there's a surprise. No, Foreman, it's not Lupus. You know, I don't understand why Cameron, Chase and Foreman ever doubt House's diagnoses. Then again, I'm asking this of people who seem genuinely surprised by and slightly fearful of the ringing from their beepers. Listen up, folks, House is always right. Say it with me: House is always right, from the diagnosis to the whodunit. And come on, how cool was it when House barged in to the ladies' room, grabbed the wife's unwashed hands and turned them purple with some chemical solution? The only thing missing from the episode was her teary confession, but the ambiguity surrounding her motive was intriguing. Let's follow the clues: The threesome, the role-playing, the wife's dispassionate discussion on why marriages fail. Apparently, the danger in marrying your high-school sweetheart is that people grow up, change and then you want to kill them: a lesson for us all. Good thing new roommates House and Wilson waited until after graduation to move in together. Between Wilson's blow-dryer-aided hairstyling and House's eating Wilson's food, it's safe to say these two will drive each other batty. But at least they won't be plotting one another's demise. — Rhoda Charles

#47
Dade

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Courtesy of: TV GUIDE, THE WATECOOLER

April 4, 2006: Oh, Snap!


It pains me to say this because I just love Sela Ward but the show is better without the Stacy drama. She's gone, House, though masking a broken heart, is pretty much over it and if these last two episodes are any evidence, he's back to his old self. Dirty dishes and stethoscopes on the doorknob aside, Wilson and House have a better shot at a long-term relationship than House and Stacy ever did. And if Stacy had sabotaged the cane there'd be hell to pay rather than the grudging respect Wilson's prank earned. House earned some respect from me too with his touching comment about apartments and divorce. Can you tell I'm loving their living together?

Another fantastic effect of a Stacy-less House is that the core cast is back in sync in a way that I didn't know was missing. I admit I only started watching the show this season after many rave reviews from my sister and at times I felt that at least one doctor, mostly Chase, was getting shortchanged storyline-wise. That still may be the case but I don't mind because I, along with millions of viewers, witnessed a momentous re-alignment in the show tonight. Did you catch it? Foreman took the "black" marker and gained control of the "white" board and I’m not talking race relations. House actually took a seat and let Foreman take the lead. Pretty significant, I'd say. It seems that Foreman's recent argumentative, and now cane grabbing, ways have proven to his mentor that Foreman's got the right stuff. And here Cameron thought she had to sleep with House to write on the board.

So, Mel Harris and Michelle Trachtenberg guested this week as an overprotective mother and an allergy-prone daughter whose unrelated anaphylactic shock and progressive paralysis stumped the doctors. What most surprised me about the show was that House figured out the problem and no one agreed with him. I mean that's not a tried and true formula or anything. Even more shocking was House taking extraordinary measures such as trapping himself in an elevator with Foreman and the at-death's-door patient to search her nether regions for a wayward killer tick. Surely that would incur the gloriously coifed Cuddy's wrath. Unless, of course, he found the tick – which of course, he did. Surprised?

Posted by: Rhoda Charles 04/5/2006 3:27 AM

#48
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SPOILER ALERT....HIGHLIGHT TO SEE...DO NOT QUOTE

Courtesy of: SPOILERFIX

03/28 - Episode 2.18 - Sleeping Dogs Lie [Airing April 18]: Two patients are being treated. One with insomnia.
04/07 - Episode 2.19 - House Vs. God [Airing April 25]: When 15-year-old faith healer, Boyd, is admitted and claims he can talk to God, House takes the case. House thinks the kid is a clever con untill the boy touches one of Wilson's cancer patients and causes her cancer to go into remission. Boyd refuses surgery on his brain because he believes it will take away his healing power, but as his condition begins to deteriorate and the condition of Wilson's cancer patient improves, House and his team must confront their own feelings about faith and God. Meanwhile, tension is still in the air between Cameron and Foreman after she accused him of stealing her idea for the medical article he had published. Source: FOX
04/10 - Episode 2.20 - Euphoria, Part 1 [Airing May 2]: The team treats Dr. Foreman after he shows symptons similar to those of one of their patients.
04/10 - Episode 2.21 - Euphoria, Part 2 [Airing Wednesday, May 3, at 8 p.m.]: House uses unconventional methods to diagnose Dr. Foreman. The latter's father visits his son.
04/13 - Episode 2.22 - Forever [Airing May 9]: House is not positive Foreman has fully recovered. The team treats a woman with a unique type of postpartum depression and interacts with Leona, a 16-year-old bi-racial Katrina victim.
03/27 - Episode 2.23 - Who's Your Daddy? [Airing May 16]
04/04 - Episode 2.24 - No Reason (Season finale) [Airing May 23]


#49
muffytepperman

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Hi Dade! I don't think that's a spoiler for House blink.gif

#50
Dade

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LOL Muffy I didn't either, but if it comes from SPOILERFIX I'm not taking any chances. To me it looks like the episode guide info.

Well shoot thats what I got for not bouble checking....ty jem for moving it ninja.gif

#51
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SPOILER ALERT...HIGHLIGHT TO SEE...DO NOT QUOTE

Courtesy of: SPOILERIFX

04/20 - Episode 2.23 - Who's Your Daddy?
[Airing May 16]: The team treats the daughter of one of House's friends. D.B. Sweeney will guest star as the father.

#52
SerenityNow

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I watched this show last night, and I didn't find it very good. I might give it another chance since I do like hospital/doctor dramas, but it just didn't really grab me at all. I found it kind of boring and didn't finish the episode. I've heard that it's good from several people, so with the season almost over, I'll give it another shot, and maybe catch it in it's summer run.

#53
Dade

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Give it another shot SN. Last nights wasn't really that good, I felt it was slow and didn't have the punch that the past episodes have had.

I haven't watched many episodes but they grabbed me enough to make me watch again. If the first one I had seen was last nights I wouldn't watch again.

#54
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Courtesy of: TV GUIDE, THE WATERCOOLER

House


April 25, 2006: You Gotta Have Faith
I can't decide if this episode was a horrific mess or a carefully constructed amalgam of profundities draped in a seemingly thought-provoking discussion of faith. My beef is that there was too much happening in this show for any one plot point to make an impact. Clearly, we are being set up for the end of the season. The hook was the teenage faith healer. Boyd of Arcadia serves more as a plot device to expose the main character's issues than as a compelling medical case. His first move after falling ill was to turn to earthbound doctors for his own healing. Long story short, he has herpes. Yet through his divine insights, Boyd reminds us where the players are on the chessboard. Chase cannot make decisions. Cameron and Foreman have trust issues. House views faith as a four-letter word (yet he tickles the ivories with the hymn "What a Friend We Have in Jesus"). Most importantly, Boyd's presence sets events in motion that reveal Wilson to be a "functional vampire" — a man feeding off of others' neediness to gain fulfillment.

It's been established that Wilson is a philanderer whose ethics have not kept him faithful to his wife. I'm not quite sure why Wilson's affair with Grace, his terminal cancer patient, is so shocking. It just is. Wilson is the voice of reason on the show, and though flawed, he is held up as a foil to everyone else's inadequacies. Now we see that he's a master manipulator. Wilson's "silver tongue" can convince a recalcitrant child of faith to put his trust in science and can tell a control freak of a doctor that he is as God made him. I have faith that we'll see the repercussions of tonight's revelations down the road, and if tonight's show served only to set up a story arc with a much bigger payoff, then I'm satisfied. If not, then I'm leaning toward "horrific mess."

Posted by Rhoda Charles 04/26/2006 7:59 AM

#55
Jem

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I agree with Dade. I normally get to see this show every couple of weeks. Last night wasn't really the best I’ve seen. Give it another shot before you decide.

#56
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SPOILER ALERT...HIGHLIGHT TO SEE...DO NOT QUOTE

04/25 - Episode 2.24 - No Reason (Season finale) [Airing May 23]: As House and his team are working on the diagnosis of Vince, a man with a giant, swollen tongue, disgruntled former patient Jack Moriarty (guest star Elias Koteas) walks into House's office and shoots him. House continues to treat Vince from his ICU hospital bed with Moriarty, shot by hospital security and hand-cuffed to his bed, as his roommate. When aftereffects of the shooting begin to impact House, he starts to question his own ability to properly diagnose. As Vince's body deteriorates, House must struggle through his self-doubt and trust his team to find a way to solve the case. Source: FOX

#57
Dade

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Two episodes of House this week....

Tuesday May 2, at 9:00pm Eastern
Part 1 of two: An inner-city cop (Scott Michael Campbell) laughs as he corners a suspect, and even thinks it's funny when the suspect shoots him. But the gunshot wound isn't why he's in danger. Meanwhile, Foreman takes an immediate dislike to the officer. In fact, when his condition deteriorates, Foreman starts laughing. Then the doc gets sick as well.

AND
Wednesday May 3, at 8:00pm Eastern
Conclusion. Now it's Foreman's turn to go blind and suffer agonizing pain from whatever it was that struck Off. Joe Luria, and a stumped House calls on his pet rat, Steve McQueen, to see what he can sniff out in Joe's filthy apartment. Rodney Foreman: Charles S. Dutton.

This also pushes Bones back to May 10, at 8:00pm Eastern

#58
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Courtesy of: TV GUIDE, THE WATERCOOLER

House


May 2, 2006: Euphoria, Part 1
You know what I liked best about the show tonight? It's something we have sort of known but hasn't been articulated. House truly cares for his staff. He even said as much, in his own way, while taking a jab at Wilson. I didn't like that so much, but House jabs out of love. You know what else I didn't like? Watching Joe, the pot-farming cop, slowly die. I wanted a happy ending for Joe, whose life was pretty pathetic. He didn't even get to go quickly. He took the express train from euphoria to abject pain and it wasn't pretty. That train will be making a return trip for Foreman, whose symptoms might have been recognized sooner had he not been acting like such a jerk lately. Despite his recent bad behavior, I feel for the guy.

So does Cameron. What does a guy have to do to make Cameron hate him? A lot. He could steal your article. He could disavow your friendship. He could stab you with a diseased needle. Cameron would still enter a hot zone to save him. That, my friends, is the mark of a special person. Whether it be short-bus special or uniquely gifted special, the jury's still out.

Speaking of the short bus — House broke the MRI machine. Frankly, I'm surprised it hasn't broken on its own given the workout it gets from House's team. It's fitting that it was the man himself who overloaded it with a corpse's bullet-filled head. Is shooting a corpse in the name of a differential diagnosis too much? You tell me. All I know is that it was creepy watching John Doe go all "night of the living dead" in the chamber. I look forward to Cuddy's reprimand for this stunt. And where is she by the way? She's certainly not in this half of the sweeps opener. Tune in tomorrow night when we find out if Foreman lives or dies, if Cameron is infected and if House can forgive Wilson his transgressions.

Posted by: Rhoda Charles 05/3/2006 2:07 PM

#59
ElleNaturelle

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So I saw Part 1, and I saw the show the following week. Stupid me totally didn't clue into the fact that Part 2 was the day after 1. I saw that Foreman was alive and well, and even nice/positive for awhile. My question though is, how? What was the infection/problem after all and how bad did it get before they found out?

#60
Jem

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Source - FOX.com

Sorry, long read and I'm posting Part 1 and 2.

EUPHORIA, PART 1
Aired 5/2/06
A cop named Joe Luria corners a young gang member in an alley. Joe giddily mocks the perp as he reads him his rights. The gang member pulls his gun and shoots. The bullet shatters against Joe’s flak jacket, with a piece deflecting up through Joe’s neck and into brain matter at the base of his skull. Joe lies on the ground, laughing as blood gushes from the wound.

House and the team deduce the cause of Joe’s hysterical reaction. Chase thinks that the bullet fragments in the brain are to blame, but House points out that it is the wrong area to cause euphoria. They will need to expand their search, factoring in Joe’s cough and cloudy lungs. Chase mentions carbon monoxide poisoning, which would explain the elevated heart rate, coughing and impaired neurological functions. House considers that the patient might have been exposed to CO indoors and went outdoors before collapsing. He orders an arterial blood gas test. In the meantime, they must check Joe’s squad car, personal car, precinct and home for gas leaks.

Chase finds low-level CO poisoning. He is about to slide Joe into the hyperbaric chamber when Joe’s fist suddenly clenches. As his brain struggles for oxygen, Joe loses motor function. That grim news can’t take away Joe’s giddiness. Yet when Cameron mentions that someone is checking Joe’s home for a gas leak, he immediately turns serious.

Foreman searches Joe’s incredibly filthy apartment for some clues. He swabs samples from the rank kitchen. Foreman then steps through the window onto the building’s roof and notices a shed with a power supply. He finds a hydroponic marijuana farm.

House goes to the precinct and hears a cop with a raspy cough. The man’s desk is right next to Joe’s, below the same air conditioning unit.

Back at the hospital, Foreman is convinced that marijuana is the explanation. House believes that Legionnaire’s disease is the cause, citing the rancid water in the AC unit as evidence. The next morning, Joe is feeling better, and Foreman observes that his COHb levels are down. Chase points out on the x-rays that the clouded area in the upper lung lobes are clearing up. Joe seems more concerned with making sure Foreman won’t reveal what was at his apartment. Suspecting something is wrong, Foreman spins around the portable light board and shows it to Joe, who agrees that the x-rays look fine. The doctors realize that Joe is blind.

Foreman reports that Joe’s papillary responses are intact, the fundus looks normal and there’s no macular degeneration. He thinks Joe has Anton’s Blindness, a condition in which patients can physically see but the brain cannot process the information. This indicates damage to both occipital lobes. A stroke is a possible explanation. House suspects a brain clot, but they can’t do an MRI because the bullet fragments will move and shred Joe’s brain. Cameron suggests an angio x-ray. Although House considers this a waste of time, the team badgers him into it.

Cameron explains to Joe that they will send a catheter through his femoral artery to his brain. Foreman remarks to him that he’ll be back on the streets scaring people. When the team reconvenes in the morgue with the results, Cameron presses House to remove Foreman from the case because he hates cops. Foreman says he was just having fun with a hypocrite, so House lets him stay. There is also the fact that Foreman is the team neurologist.

The angio shows some clotting, but not enough to be decisive. House again suggests an MRI, which Foreman again shoots down. House pulls out a gun and shoots a cadaver with an identical bullet. They can now run a test MRI to see how the bullet is affected. Cameron and Chase are shocked and scared, while Foreman is merely bemused.

Cameron continues to harp on Foreman’s behavior. House asks whether it was aggressive or giddy, noting that Foreman’s amusement at the gunshot isn’t a normal reaction. Foreman adamantly insists that being bored by House’s insanity isn’t proof of illness. With the cadaver in place, House flicks the switch on the MRI. The bullets are immediately ripped out of the skull and forever buried in the magnetic coils.

They learn that the MRI is out of commission for at least two weeks. Foreman wonders if doing nothing is their only option, seeing as how the giddiness seems to have disappeared. The blindness hasn’t, so House orders an echo of Joe’s heart to search for the source of the clots. They could get lucky.

As Cameron and Chase perform the ultrasound, Joe goes into tachycardia. They rush to save him, while Foreman merely stands back and giggles. Chase recognizes intracranial bleeding, forcing them to cut Joe’s temple to relieve the pressure. Foreman can’t stop laughing.

Foreman is sealed in an airtight bio-safety room with Joe and two nurses wearing full biohazard suits. He still insists that he’s fine, but House is more focused on finally getting a chance to use an MRI to locate the problem. They will use it on Foreman.

House draws his own blood sample and informs Chase and Cameron that anybody with an elevated SED rate is joining Foreman. He has noticed in the MRI an area of increased T2 attenuation in the cingulated cortex. This mushiness would explain the euphoria, but what explains the mushiness? House asks who wants to investigate Joe’s apartment next. Cameron turns to leave, but House stops her. Foreman brought back samples from the apartment. House was merely testing them.

Cameron sorts through the samples using protective gloves built into a protective steel case. At the same time, Chase tries to draw blood from Foreman. Foreman asks Chase what they’re thinking because he believes it might be a staph infection. If Chase delivers linezolid directly into their brains, Foreman and Joe can be cured.

The samples test negative for toluene, arsenic and lead, and the blood is negative for West Nile or Eastern equine diseases. Cameron wants to go to the apartment for more samples, but House refuses to allow it. He wants to take a sample from Joe’s brain, but surgery is impossible because he is on blood thinners. Using Foreman is the only option. Chase tries to resist with everything Foreman told him earlier. Yet House knows where Chase is getting this line of thought.

House heads down to the isolation chamber to talk to Foreman directly. House doubts that he has a staph infection because it would present in numerous different ways before a brain abscess. House offers Foreman a release to sign so he can biopsy his brain, but Foreman wants to see the MRI first. He insists that the mushy spot on the x-ray could have developed into an abscess by now. House mentions fever and Foreman’s reads 101.6. Foreman insists that House put an omaya reservoir into his skull and treat him for staph.

A neurosurgeon drills into Foreman’s skull, exposing his brain. Foreman, wide awake during the procedure, looks at flash cards for Chase and identifies the simple shapes on each one. Foreman then hears House’s voice coming from behind his head and realizes what’s going on. House is going to biopsy his brain. Foreman orders him to get out of his temporal lobe.

Foreman wakes in the middle of the night, back in the isolation room. Joe says he can’t see anything, and Foreman is encouraged by this because Joe is now aware of his blindness.

The biopsy shows non-specific signs of inflammation. Cameron quickly points out that House’s “can’t miss” idea stole a billion of Foreman’s brain cells, turning up nothing. Yet the biopsy was also negative for a staph infection. Cameron again asks to go into the apartment. House turns her down once more. They will instead retest the samples for any toxin, bacteria or fungus that attacks the brain. House orders Cameron to suit up to monitor Foreman for Anton’s Blindness. They need to track Foreman to see how far behind he is from Joe.

Wilson questions why House is being so cautious and avoiding Joe’s apartment. House doesn’t want to lose another doctor. Wilson realizes that Foreman is not simply another patient to House, no matter what he claims.

As Joe writhes in agony, Cameron tells Foreman they found nothing in his brain. Foreman suggests returning to the apartment because he might have missed something. The cause may be listeriosis. Cameron says that they cannot go back because of the danger. Foreman becomes angry. He picks up a syringe he used to draw his own blood and jabs Cameron in the leg. He says she can either tell House what happened or head to Joe’s apartment to save all three of them.

House and Chase stand outside the chamber as Foreman throws out possible diseases to them. Joe continues screaming in pain, so Foreman picks up a syringe and injects morphine into his IV. Chase yells that Joe is already at his daily limit and more could kill him. Realizing that the pain could cause a stress cardiomyopathy, House makes no attempt to stop Foreman. The screaming continues, and the doctors realize that Joe has a new symptom -- hyperalgesia. The infection has spread to the pain center of the brain, which is telling Joe that his entire body is in tremendous pain. No amount of medicine can soothe it. House tells Chase to suit up and induce Joe into a coma.

Foreman continues to throw out explanations to House, who wonders why Foreman isn’t concerned that Cameron is missing. When Foreman doesn’t react, House starts to figure out where she is.

Cameron samples Joe’s entire apartment, including his rooftop farm. As she is re-sealing the biohazard tape on the door, she turns and finds House. Cameron tells him about the needle, and House can’t believe she came to the apartment instead of killing him on the spot. Even by breaking the skin, the chances of infection were remote. Cameron wanted to be here.

House roots through Cameron’s samples. He’s disinterested by the normal garbage, but his curiosity is piqued by the inclusion of three loaves of rye bread. He sends Cameron back inside. Using his cell phone, he directs her out onto the roof with the bread in order to draw out pigeons. He instructs Cameron to look for pigeon droppings. She doesn’t find any, and House has her look for a dustpan because he figures Joe uses the droppings for fertilizer. She finds a used scraper on a bucket. The bucket full of pigeon droppings is the perfect home for Cryptococcus neoformans. Once that enters the brain, it causes happiness, blindness and intractable pain.

Cameron puts a sample of droppings onto a slide and adds GMS stain. She doesn’t get the result she was expecting and sprints upstairs. In the isolation room, Joe crashes. Cameron runs up and tells the team that the sample was negative for Cryptococcus. As the doctors suit up, Foreman shocks Joe with no results. A subsequent epi injection does nothing. Joe dies.

EUPHORIA, PART 2
Aired 5/3/06
House implores Cuddy to let him take a sample from Joe’s brain. She refuses because Joe’s death made this a bio-safety hazard. The CDC will perform the autopsy and return results to them in three days. House points out that Foreman might be dead in 36 hours, but Cuddy doesn’t budge. They don’t have the tools to do this safely, so it’s out of her hands.

House comes up with an idea, and he heads down to the isolation room. He slides an ice pick and hammer through the airlock, telling Foreman to cut into Joe’s eye in order to extract some brain tissue. Cuddy rushes down and orders Foreman to stop. She then has another doctor suit up and enter the room to restrain Foreman. House presses Foreman to continue. Instead of slamming the pick into Joe’s eye, Foreman drives it into the mattress. Foreman senses that it didn’t feel right, but he removes a sample from the mattress anyway thinking that it is Joe’s brain. Realizing that Foreman has Anton’s Blindness, House asks Cuddy if she still wants to wait for the CDC. House, Cameron and Chase convene for a differential diagnosis on Foreman. They throw out various diseases, none seeming likely to be the culprit. House orders them to start treatment for everything they can think of. He leaves to find another brain to biopsy. Even though they are worried that a heavy regimen will trash Foreman’s organs, Chase and Cameron slide the pills to him. Foreman feels each pill and discerns what it is for. He realizes that they have no idea what’s afflicting him and grudgingly takes the medication.

House goes to Joe’s apartment in a biosuit. He has the rat that he trapped in Stacy’s attic months ago with him. He calls Foreman in the iso room and asks him to detail his steps. House carefully inspects each area, making sure to expose the rat to everything that Foreman was around. When House hangs up, Foreman calls his father.

The next morning, Wilson finds House staring intently at his computer. House has set up a webcam to monitor the rat in his own kitchen. As soon as the rat becomes sick, House will perform an autopsy.

Cameron draws blood from Foreman and he notices that she left the tourniquet on his bed. His vision is returning in response to the treatment. Yet which treatment worked? House wants to stop individual medicines one by one to find the one that caused a regression in his vision. Before Cameron can do anything, Chase reports that Foreman’s amylase and lipase levels are three times the normal level. His pancreas is failing due to the meds, which must be stopped immediately.

House goes to Foreman and tells him what’s happening with the meds. Foreman asks him to lower the dosages, but even lower doses would be toxic. If they continue the meds, Foreman will appear to see for the next four hours until he dies. If they stop, he’ll lose his vision but buy time for a diagnosis. Foreman agrees to cut the meds.

Foreman’s father Rodney arrives, and House explains to him that a brain is available but Cuddy won’t allow them to autopsy it. House then escorts Rodney to Cuddy’s office, and the man questions her about her decision. Cuddy struggles to give him an answer, and explains that the deadly infection Foreman has could put many more lives in danger. This Rodney understands.

Foreman assures his father that it won’t be a painful demise. Wilson catches up with House outside of the morgue to report that the rat is still healthy. He also has noted that House is preoccupied with the guard stationed in front of the cooler holding Joe’s body.

Foreman’s vision regresses and he has reached an eight on the pain scale. The disease is progressing faster than it did in Joe. House is slightly encouraged by the anomaly and asks the team what that could mean. Cameron comes up with the fact that many diseases affect blacks differently than whites. House has them look up all bacterials, fungals, toxins and parasites to find any documented racial disparities. House remembers that the rat is still perfectly healthy and he thinks perhaps that’s the difference between Foreman and Joe.

Cuddy visits Foreman in isolation. He’s enraged that she won’t ignore CDC policy to help save his life. House comes in and announces to Foreman that he’s dying too fast. He holds up a vial holding legionella pneumophila. Joe had Legionnaire’s disease when he got infected, and it somehow slowed down the progression. Joe didn’t die until they cured the Legionnaire’s. Foreman refuses to inject himself. House simply opens the door to the isolation chamber and tosses the vial in. It shatters.

Cameron watches as Foreman takes his own temperature. It’s down to 101.0, and Foreman reluctantly admits that his pain is no worse. He did contract Legionnaire’s, and it has indeed slowed the progression of the mystery disease.

With the rat still not sick, Wilson wonders aloud what House will do if the rat never falls ill. House has a realization, and declares Wilson’s suggestion as brilliant. He walks out and asks Cameron what illnesses affect humans and not rats. House then tells her that she didn’t become sick because whatever it is isn’t blood-borne.

Chase suggests that some bacterial infections don’t affect rats, but Cameron counters that Foreman has tested negative for every bacterial infection that affects the brains. House observes that when they test for bacterial infections, they’re really looking for antibodies. The body might not be fighting the infection. If the body doesn’t recognize the first infection, that infection will run rampant through the body. Yet when Legionnaire’s is contracted, the body does recognize that and increases white cell count to stave it off. The body unintentionally fights the first infection as well. They need to figure out what bacterial infection affects humans and not rats which the body is unlikely to recognize.

House informs Foreman that the answer is Listeria, so he will start him on Amp and Gent. He puts the antibiotics in the airlock, but Foreman requests certainty. He asks House to perform a white matter biopsy. House refuses, because any slip will render Foreman an invalid. Foreman fears the antibiotics will bring back the pain if House is wrong. House begs him to try the medicine first. If it doesn’t work, he will biopsy the brain again. Foreman takes the pills.

As Cameron changes the antibiotics IV bag, Foreman writhes in pain. He implores her to put him in a coma, asking her to be his medical proxy. He quotes from her medical journal article about the importance of a well-informed decision. Foreman then apologizes for stealing her material for his own article. She agrees to be his proxy, but doesn’t forgive him for what he’s done.

Chase finds Rodney Foreman in the hospital chapel and lets him know that they need to put his son in a medical coma. However, if they cannot solve the problem, he won’t wake up. Chase suggests that he visit his boy before that happens. Rodney dons a bio suit and spends a few moments with Foreman before Cameron induces the coma. As she administers the IV, Cameron tells Foreman that she accepts his earlier apology.

Wilson implores House to perform the biopsy, dismissing House’s claim that it is too dangerous. Wilson asserts that House doesn’t spend time with patients because he’ll get close to them. If it were anyone else, he would have drilled into their heads long ago. Cameron reports that the EEG shows that Foreman is still in pain. She demands they do the biopsy now. House still refuses. Cameron hands him the paper showing her legal proxy status.

Cuddy confirms that the proxy letter checks out. She instructs Cameron to proceed with the biopsy and ignore House’s interference. Cameron remarks that Cuddy is no hero because they could have cut into a dead man’s head long ago. Cameron then apologizes. House follows her out and begs for an hour. He wants to go back to Joe’s apartment and to see if another animal died. The place was such a dump, there must be more vermin there. If House finds something, he can cut its head open instead of Foreman’s. Cameron tells House that when Foreman’s O2 stats hit 90, she must proceed.

House, not wearing a biosuit, again inspects the apartment. He notices a pigeon hit the window and the rooftop shed. The bird is blind. House stalks the bird, but it flies off.

Cameron readies the neurosurgery tools. Cameron calls House to announce that she is about to proceed, but House tells her that the water Joe uses for his marijuana might be the answer. Cameron already tested that water and it is clean. House is stumped. Foreman’s O2 stats drop to 89, so Cameron starts the biopsy.

House follows the piping to a water tank. He quickly calls Cameron to say that they tested the wrong water. The tank he found is riddled with Naegleria. She already knows this because her biopsy showed the same results. House is dismayed.

Cameron finds Rodney Foreman to let him know that his son has primary amoebic meningoencephalitis, which is a parasite that goes through the nose and migrates into the brain. There it feeds on brain cells. It is treatable and will cause no lasting damage. However, they don’t yet know if the surgery or coma produced any side effects.

Foreman gets transferred from isolation to the ICU. He comes out of the coma and doesn’t feel any pain. House tests his vision and Foreman successfully follows his finger. House then asks Foreman to identify the people in the room. Foreman realizes that they performed the biopsy. He successfully names Cameron, his father and House. House then asks Foreman to wiggle his left toes. Although Foreman says he moved them, his toes remain still. House becomes concerned, and has Foreman raise his right arm. Foreman raises his left.




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