Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Dade

Kid Nation In The Media

Recommended Posts

Courtesy of: REALITY TV MAGAZINE

Kid Nation Cast Announced

CBS introduced today the 40 kids who will participate in KID NATION, the new reality-based series which premieres Wednesday, Sept. 19 (8:00-9:00 PM, ET/PT) on the CBS Television Network. KID NATION features 40 kids, or "Pioneers," who will have 40 days to form a new society in a ghost town that died in the 19th Century. These kids, ages 8-15, will spend more than a month without their parents or modern comforts in Bonanza City, N.M., attempting to do what their forefathers could not - build a town that works. They will cook their own meals, clean their own outhouses, haul their own water and even run their own businesses - including the old town saloon (root beer only). They'll also create a real government - four kid leaders who will guide the kids through their adventure, pass laws and set bedtimes. Through it all, they'll cope with regular childhood emotions and situations: homesickness, peer pressure and the urge to break every rule they've ever known.

At the end of each episode, all 40 kids will gather at an old fashioned Town Hall meeting where they will not only debate the issues facing Bonanza City, but also decide which worthy Pioneer will be awarded the coveted Gold Star, worth $20,000. They'll show wisdom beyond their years and the candor that only kids can exhibit.

There are no eliminations on KID NATION - you only go home if you want to. And in every Town Hall meeting, kids may raise their hands and leave. Will they stick it out?

In the end, will these kids prove to adults everywhere - and their own parents - that they have the vision to create a better world than the pioneers who came before them? And just as importantly, will they come together as a cohesive unit, or will they abandon all responsibility and succumb to the childhood temptations that lead to round-the-clock chaos?

The 40 "Pioneers" participating in KID NATION are (in alphabetical order):

ALEX

Age: 9

Hometown: Reno, Nev.

Favorite subject: Geography

When I grow up I want to be: "I'm not sure what I would like to be when I grow up, but I currently think that it would be interesting to be a linguist, geography teacher and/or a chemist."

ANJAY

Age: 12

Hometown: Pearland, Texas

Political views: "If I could hold one office in politics it would be Secretary of the State, so I could suggest the policies for the future of the U.S.A."

Role Model: "Mahatma Gandhi, because he gained India's independence without firing a single shot or shedding a drop of blood."

BLAINE

Age: 14

Hometown: North Palm Beach, Fla.

My Perfect Day: "There is nothing I like better than to spend the day at the beach, waiting on the perfect wave to surf on my favorite board."

Rode Model: "My Dad is my hero and role model, hands down! He is an Engineer/First Mate on a 124' private yacht, and some day I want to do the same thing, 'cause I love to work with my hands, be on the water, travel to exciting places and meet new people."

BRETT

Age: 11

Hometown: Edina, Minn.

Accomplishments: "I am working with families on changing the family law in Minnesota that upholds contact between kids and their 'non-custodial' parents, creating 'Ryan's Law.'"

Political Views: "I am very conscious of world events and concerns. I believe the best way I can help my community and world is to spread good energy to others."

CAMPBELL

Age: 10

Hometown: Thomasville, Ga.

What I want to be when I grow up: "I would like to be a political person because good government is important and I could help the economy."

If I could switch places with someone: "I would like to switch places with the President of the United States so that I could perform the daily duties and protect the wildlife."

CODY

Age: 9

Hometown: Newport, Ohio

When I grow up I want to be: "A police officer."

Political views: "If I could write a law, gas prices would be $0.25 a gallon."

COLTON

Age: 11

Hometown: Reno, Nev.

Accomplishments: "My football team made it to the playoffs and was named the All-Star team. Also, I won my first belt buckle at the Wadsworth Rodeo."

Political Views: "I feel that no matter who you vote for, someone is always going to disagree with the president's judgment."

DIVAD

Age: 11

Hometown: Fayetteville, Ga.

Personality traits: "Kind, helpful, honest - I am a great leader and I like to make others laugh."

If I could write one law: "If I could write a law, I would make it illegal to charge medical care to someone who can't afford it."

DK

Age: 14

Hometown: Chicago

If I could switch places with someone: "I would switch places with the President of the United States - this would be the opportunity to have a positive influence on others and make the world a better place."

Goals and Aspirations: "I want to inspire kids everywhere. I want to be able to prove all things are possible if you put your mind to it and believe in yourself."

EMILIE

Age: 9

Hometown: Sparks, Nev.

Favorite hobbies: "Horse back riding, finding adventure and basketball."

If I could switch places with someone: "I wouldn't switch places with anyone because I appreciate myself."

ERIC

Age: 14

Hometown: Morristown, N.J.

Role model: "As a musician, my role model would be Paul McCartney. I play many of the same instruments as him and his life is very inspiring to me"

Goals and aspirations: "My career goal would involve music, leadership and teaching others. I want to inspire and help others."

GIANNA

Age: 10

Hometown: Chicago

When I grow up I want to be: "I want to be an actress or President of the United States."

Role models: "My family and my educators - they all help me to learn and grow in different ways."

GREG

Age: 15

Hometown: Reno, Nev.

When I grow up I want to be: "A mechanical engineer - working at my dad's shop (dad is a master mechanic) gives me the experience I need to become a successful engineer someday designing cars or something."

If I could switch places with anyone: "It would be my mom, because I want to know how she does it. She raises me and my sister, keeps a clean house, does paperwork at the shop, cooks dinner and yet she still has time to go out and work with the horses. She's amazing."

GUYLAN

Age: 11

Hometown: Upton, Mass.

Experiences: "My parents are exotic animal trainers, therefore providing me the opportunity to live and work with bears, camels, baboons, lions, tigers and elephants literally in my back yard since I was a year old. I also grew up living in two zoos in New England, York's Wild Kingdom and Southwick's Zoo, for a few years."

Goals and Aspirations: "To stop global warming; to seek out new life and civilizations and to boldly go were no man (boy) has gone before."

HUNTER

Age: 12

Hometown: Martinez, Ga.

Interests and hobbies: "Basketball, biking, water sports, golf, fly fishing, hunting and reading."

Goals and aspirations: "I would like to go to college and be in one of the branches of the armed forces."

JARED

Age: 11

Hometown: Dunwoody, Ga.

If I could hold a political position: "I would be Speaker of the House."

If I could write one law: "I would write a law that required specific requirements for animal refuge centers."

JASMINE

Age: 11

Hometown: Atlanta

Goals and aspirations: "When I grow up I would like to have my own television show, an artist development company or a School of Performing Arts.

If I could switch places with someone: "No one, because I love the people in my life and I would not want to change that."

JIMMY

Age: 8

Hometown: Salem, N.H.

Political views: "If I could outlaw something it would be weapons and war."

If I could switch places with someone: "It would be Bill Gates, because he is the richest man in the world and very smart."

KELSEY

Age: 11

Hometown: Furlong, Pa.

People would be surprised to learn: "That I performed on piano at Carnegie Hall when I was in the fourth grade, which was a great honor to experience."

Political views: "I think it was a bad choice to send soldiers to Iraq to fight. If I could change something about our world it would be to let all world and nationwide disagreements to be settled peacefully."

KENNEDY

Age: 12

Hometown: Ashland, Ky.

Accomplishments: "I started the program 'Break the Cycle with Reading,' spending Saturdays reading to inmates' children who were visiting their parents that are locked up; I'm a highly-ranked tennis player across Kentucky, the south, and the nation."

Role Model: "President John F. Kennedy - he had high hopes for our country and was fearless."

LAUREL

Age: 12

Hometown: Medford, Mass.

If I could write one law: "I would make a 'no bullies' law. I believe bullies are truly cowards and I think if bullies were gone the world would be a better place."

If I could hold one position in government: "I would like to be in a position where I could make decisions that would affect people's lives in a positive way."

LEILA

Age: 9

Hometown: Charlotte, N.C.

Favorite hobbies or sports: "I have been doing beauty pageants since I was a baby. I usually do about 15-20 pageants a year. I also enjoy riding horses with my oldest brother at the barn and going to my other brother's high school football games."

If I could change one thing in the world: "I would want to make people more honest and nice with each other."

MADISON

Age: 11

Hometown: El Paso, Texas

Goals and aspirations: "I have always dreamed of being an actress, being in movies, and in many plays."

Quote: "If I could change one thing in the world I would change people's desire to be perfect. NO ONE is perfect, and you don't need to be a Barbie to be loved. You are perfect in someone's eyes."

MAGGIE

Age: 14

Hometown: Evansville, Minn.

Experiences: "I was adopted as a baby, and still know my birth parents. I keep in touch with them and my brothers and sister. I live on a hobby farm in a one-room house, with no indoor bathroom."

Political Views: "I would outlaw smoking and war - they both kill - and bombs kill innocent kids."

MALLORY (OLIVIA'S SISTER)

Age: 8

Hometown: Indianapolis

When I grow up I want to be: "A pediatrician - I want to help people."

People would be surprised to learn: "That I play soccer better than most boys on my team."

MARKELLE

Age: 12

Hometown: Marietta, Ga.

When I grow up I want to be: "An entertainer."

Quote: "If I could change one thing in the world, I would make sure that all kids with single parents have good role models and mentors to make sure that they have the same amount of opportunities and love and grow up to be happy."

MICHAEL

Age: 14

Hometown: Monroe, Wash.

If I could write one law: "I would allow gay marriage. I think it's time to stick to equal rights."

If I could hold one political office: "I would be a White House Press Correspondent."

MIGLE

Age: 13

Hometown: Downers Grove, Ill.

If I could write one law: "I would make it a law that mothers couldn't leave their kids."

Role Model/Hero: "My hero is my mom. She has been through some tough times and is always there for me."

MIKE

Age: 11

Hometown: Bellevue, Wash.

Role Model/Hero: "Raoul Wallenburg, who was a Swedish citizen who saved thousands of Jewish lives during the holocaust."

If I could hold office in politics: "I would like to be in Congress and be on special committees so that I could work in small groups to write laws."

MORGAN

Age: 12

Hometown: Indianapolis, Ind.

If I could write one law: "I would outlaw smoking in the U.S."

Quote: "If I could change one thing in the world, I would rid the world of prejudice because it's unnecessary and we are all equal in God's eyes."

NATASHA

Age: 13

Hometown: Miami

Favorite subject: "I think right now my favorite subjects are art and civics because in art, you can just express yourself on paper using anything you want, and in civics, I get so into learning about the government and laws and things involving the amendments and rules, I just find it so cool."

When I grow up I want to be: "I'm still finding my place in the world and I'm not absolutely sure what I want to do when I'm older. I'm young and I'm still experimenting my skills in different subjects so I want to first find my strengths and weaknesses and then go from there on what I'll be most committed to."

NATHAN

Age: 11

Hometown: Mount Prospect, Ill.

If I could switch places with someone: "The President of the United States, so that I could run the country and make all the rules."

When I grow up I want to be: "Either running my own business or an architect or interior designer."

OLIVIA (MALLORY's SISTER)

Age: 12

Hometown: Indianapolis, Ind.

Goals and Aspirations: "I want to be a journalist because I love to write."

Role model: "Nellie Bly; I also admire my mom's ability to work, my sister's logic and my dad's writing abilities."

PHARAOH

Age: 12

Hometown: Philadelphia

If I could write one law: "I would write a law that puts more police officers in school. I would also write a law that bans any form of discrimination."

What others would be surprised to learn about me: "That I ride horses and play polo."

RANDI

Age: 11

Hometown: Sparks, Nev.

When I grow up I want to be: "A horse trainer - I have learned the proper techniques and I would love to be able to teach them to others."

If I could write one law: "No one over the age of 65 is allowed to smoke. Also, we would all have to go back to riding horses."

SAVANNAH

Age: 10

Hometown: Partridge, Ky.

When I grow up I want to be: "A lawyer or zookeeper - a lawyer is interesting and makes a lot of money, and a zookeeper because I like animals and want to learn more about them."

What others would be surprised to learn about me: "That I like bugs, frogs, lizards and other gross things."

SOPHIA

Age: 14

Hometown: Winter Park, FL

Accomplishments: "In elementary school, I began a 'non-violent protest' to have the school closed for President's Day and was successful. I also founded a club for Jewish students in middle school, where they only had a social organization for Christian students."

If I could write one law: "I would outlaw ignorance. I would write a law that said that everyone must be literate and aware of what is going on in the world around them."

SOPHIE

Age: 10

Hometown: Issaquah, Wash.

When I grow up I want to be: "An author and a professional soccer player. If I'm lucky, I'd also like to be an actress. I'm a busy girl!"

Accomplishments: "I have a company called 'Art in the Heart' to raise money for the SPCA every year. I make paintings and bookmarks with my own art, then sell them at the local farmer's markets and then give 50 percent of the profits to them. For the last two years, I have won the city's 'chalk art' competition for the elementary level."

TAYLOR

Age: 10

Hometown: Sylvester, Ga.

When I grow up I want to be: "A paleontologist because I love science."

Miscellaneous: "I am passionate about pageants because I want to be Miss America or Miss USA one day. Also, I enjoy hunting for arrowheads with my family. I have over 2,000 arrowheads in my collection."

ZACH

Age: 10

Hometown: Miami Beach, Fla.

Goals and aspirations: "I plan to go the Air Force Academy."

Role model(s): "My dad, he really sets an example for me."

Quote: "I am passionate about helping people that are sick."

KID NATION is hosted by Jonathan Karsh and is a production of Tom Forman Productions and Good TV, Inc. Tom Forman is the executive producer. Scott Einziger is the co-executive producer.

Posted by Joe Reality on August 15, 2007 at 11:24 PM

.............................

I saw something on the behind the scenes stuff for this show and there adults every where (including Medics) but they do not interfere with what the kids do.

I will give it a shot and see how it goes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Courtesy of: TV GUIDE, TV GUIDE NEWS

The Citizens of Kid Nation Are Revealed

At noon today (EDIT: yesterday) CBS will introduce the 40 child citizens of Kid Nation, its controversial new reality show about youngsters who build their own society from scratch in a desert ghost town

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Courtesy of: REALITYBLURRED

Kid Nation kids drank bleach; authorities investigated

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Courtesy of: ZAP2IT

CBS Addresses 'Kid Nation' Controversies

By Maria Elena Fernandez, L.A. Times

August 22, 2007

32038665.jpg

'Kid Nation'

On Tuesday, the brewing controversy over CBS' "Kid Nation," the forthcoming reality television series that placed 40 children, ages 8 to 15, in the New Mexico desert to build a society without contact with their parents for 40 days, became even more complicated.

There are two central issues: whether CBS went around child labor laws and whether the children's safety was at risk during the taping of the show.

Janis Miles, the mother of a 12-year-old girl who was burned in the face while cooking, filed a complaint in June in Georgia, where she lives. She has asked for an investigation into "abusive acts to minors and possible violations of child labor laws." Her complaint was forwarded to Santa Fe County Sheriff Greg Solano, who on July 20 posted an item on his department blog revealing Miles' claims and stating he had found no criminal wrongdoing related to the production.

CBS issued a statement to The Times on Tuesday, in part to dispute the "course of action being taken by one parent in distorting the true picture of the 'Kid Nation' experience." The creator of the show, Tom Forman, and a CBS lawyer also defended the production.

"These kids were in good hands and under good care with procedures and safety structures that arguably rival or surpass any school or camp in the country," the CBS statement read.

The network denied The Times' request to interview Miles. When reached by telephone, Miles said she could not speak without the consent of CBS. Miles has not filed a lawsuit against CBS or Forman's production company, Good Time TV. In an interview, Forman said he is unaware of any other disgruntled parents.

But CBS and the producers are also contending with the public statements of New Mexico state officials, who claim the producers and the network sidestepped child-welfare and labor laws.

At issue is whether Good Time TV Inc. was required to apply for work permits for the children or special waivers that exempted them. State officials say they were required to, but CBS and Forman contend that they did not have to because the children were not employees.

"The cameras are following people through an experience but those people are not working in the same way that one normally thinks of working a job," said Jonathan Anschell, executive vice president and general counsel for CBS Corp.

The children did receive $5,000 stipends, and they competed for $20,000 gold stars in each episode.

Anschell, however, said the stipend and rewards are not considered wages for work because, "It's a stipend for participating in the show. It's not tied to specific output or tasks."

Inspectors from the Department of Workforce Solutions say producers did not follow standard procedures when they denied them access to the set three times to investigate the permit issue. According to spokesman Carlos Castaneda, the production began April 1 and the inspector first appeared on the ranch April 13. The inspector was allowed into an area where producers work, but was not allowed to observe filming. The next day he was not allowed access because it was a "closed set." When the inspector returned Monday, the CBS lawyers had contacted county officials and the attorney general's office, so the inspector left.

Anschell disputed this version of the events, saying that the inspector was allowed on set April 13, took photographs of the children running through a challenge with the crew, and left because Forman was unavailable. Anschell said the inspector did not show up on set again until Monday. By then, local lawyers working for CBS had filed letters with the attorney general's office and other state departments outlining why they believed no work permits were necessary.

Castaneda said none of his inspectors ever took photographs and he wondered why CBS chose to go over his department to the attorney general's office without meeting with his inspectors first.

Anschell said CBS lawyers in New Mexico turned to the attorney general because that office has jurisdiction over the entire state, and added that in that correspondence "there was no indication that we were in violation of labor laws."

But in May 1 correspondence obtained Tuesday by The Times, an assistant attorney general had raised skepticism over the CBS lawyers' interpretation of the laws. In a follow-up letter May 24, after production was over, the assistant attorney general wrote that the point was now moot but asked the lawyers to "involve us in the sorting out, in advance, any possible difficulties" in the future.

When the filming of "Kid Nation" ended and the parents picked up their children, producers met with them to discuss what had transpired over the 40 days and what they could expect would happen next. During that meeting, Miles expressed her concerns over the burns and other marks on her child's body.

Although Miles' complaint lists other children's injuries, including fractured bones, none of the children broke any bones, according to Forman, CBS and several of the participants and their parents. One girl sprained her arm, and she and another child were taken to a local emergency room at different times to have X-rays. No other children visited hospitals during the 40 days, he said, not even the four children who accidentally drank bleach from an unmarked bottle.

The parents of a 14-year-old boy, DK of Chicago, said Tuesday that their son was not seriously hurt and did not want to return home when he got sick from drinking bleach. DK was mixing drinks and picked up the wrong bottle, which was unmarked. Three other children sipped the liquid to try to determine what was making him sick, but they spit it out immediately. (CBS did not release participants' last names, nor those of their parents, to protect the children.)

Although the children were not allowed to call home, a producer called parents every three days to offer updates on the children, and a producer called DK's parents immediately after he swallowed the bleach, his parents said.

Children were allowed to leave at any time and, in fact, "a few" did. CBS has declined to specify how many and has denied requests for any of those children to be interviewed.

From the beginning, Forman knew the "provocative" nature of his show, which is scheduled to premiere Sept. 19, would spark controversy.But he said he was "horrified" at the abuse allegations. "Child abuse is a horrendous thing and it disgusts me that people would take that phrase and throw it around so casually."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A citizen of 'Kid Nation'; Salem boy had role in controversial CBS reality show

By Rebecca Correa , Staff writer

Eagle-Tribune

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Unions Seize on 'Kid Nation' Controversy

Aug 30, 2007

LOS ANGELES (AP)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ALeqM5gmKKjMzQphltZqTcBPKMLL2HMIpw.jpg

This 2007 photo, supplied by CBS, show children identified by CBS, left to right, as Divad, Kelsey and Zach cooking up a meal on an episode of "Kid Nation," the new reality series which premieres on Sept. 19, 2007. The show has prompted complaints from Divad's mother, Janis Miles of Fayetteville, Ga., and may have skirted New Mexico's child-protection laws.(AP Photo/CBS, Monty Brinton) Photo: Monty Brinton/ CBS. All Rights Reserved.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Column posted by Nikki Finke at www.deadlinehollywooddaily.com Sept 18, 2007

No KID NATION Screeners for CBS Board

So CBS' despicable child exploitation series masquerading as a reality show Kid Nation premieres tomorrow. Many of the network's biggest advertisers have passed on it. Newspaper editorials have condemned it. Children were hurt making it. Les Moonves manipulated his board of directors because of it. Speaking of that board, much has been made of the fact that CBS refused to send out advance screeners to TV critics. But I've learned that the network has not even given its board of directors an opportunity to see the series in advance. Instead, the directors will wind up watching the show along with the rest of the nation. The board doesn't even get the courtesy of the screenings which CBS has set up at a few elementary schools in major TV markets like Miami, Philadelphia, Chicago, Boston and Denver. So I have to ask: on what planet is this considered adequate corporate governance, especially since Kid Nation has taken on the dimensions of a national scandal? I've also discovered that the board was told only about those injuries to Kid Nation children which the media first revealed. So no full accounting of every doctor or nurse or hospital visit by the kids, or description of their injuries, was ever provided by CBS to its directors despite requests. Shameful. For more background and detail, read my previous: Moonves Should Pull the Plug on Kid Nation

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kevin get over yourself okay , you been on ever part of this message board and so far you look alot like the lone ranger;

lets cover child labor laws, are they involked when a child decides to go out and play a game with friends or play a rpg video game , no. Isn't this show the same thing when all is said and done the kids are chosing to go play the game of lets be the adults. The dream of most kids and yes I dreamed what it would be like to be them and be in charge. But these kids getting the chance to do it and live it , for most of us was just that a dream. So if a child is deciding with the approval of his parents to play the adult rpg video or real life game , where do child labor laws come in to that . Maybe I am blind cause I just don't see it , if the kids were forced to go there and work in child labor camps would be one thing. But these kids chose to go and play the game of I am the adult and I can do better then them , it is that just a game not a job . They can go home at any time they wish so tell me where is the law crossed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Courtesy of: REALITY TV MAGAZINE

First Kid Quits Kid Nation

jimmy_kidnation.jpg

The premiere episode of the controversial CBS reality TV series Kid Nation kicked off with thirty-six kids on a school bus bound for a deserted town called

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The show involves 40 children between the ages of 8 and 15, abandoned in a ghost town for 40 days without any adult supervision and that's just what mainly bothered the critics

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Courtesy of: REALITY TV MAGAZINE

Kid Nation Chicken Killings

kidnation_chicken.jpg

In a Kid Nation episode entitled

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know this show is not for me, there are enough reality based shows on the air. What in the world are these networks thinking these days.

Yes I am sure these kids are very articulate and bright kids but use these gifts in a way that does not seem exploitive. Just let kids be kids, they grow up too fast now!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Courtesy of: REALITY DISH

Captain's Log: Kid Nation - Episode 2

A quick recap of the first week with kids getting used to everything and then being split into different divisions: Red, Blue, Yellow, and Green. The first competition to determine the class-system was won by Red and one kid went home. Jimmy was just too home sick and couldn't take it anymore. Sophia won the first gold star worth $20,000 and the kids are ready for week two.

To Kill Or Not To Kill

The kids are feeding the chickens and gathering some eggs. It is amazing how many of them seem to have never seen a live chicken before. But the Town Council reads the book and finds a helpful hint that may help them survive on more then just biscuits and pasta. They could always kill a chicken and have a great meal like the old settlers did. Somehow I wouldn't doubt that Greg from the Blue team would have a problem lopping off a chicken's head.

Sophia is still in the kitchen even though that's Yellow's job. Town Council is meeting again and the boys are all about killing some chickens though while the girls think it should be left up to the whole town. Laurel's accent is really random. It just comes and goes. The town seems divided on killing the chickens. Greg is a former butcher. I KNEW IT!

Meanwhile Emilie seems like a nine year old member of PETA. Alright.

The vote is held and "killing chickens" wins out. Emilie lets the Town Council know she will leave if they kill chickens. Now she has locked herself and like two others in the chicken coop until they change their minds. Crazy hippie kids!

Another little town meeting and the hippies have agreed to let a couple chickens be killed. Greg has on his apron and they bring the chicken to a chopping log in the middle of a field. Now explain to me why the hippies are out there watching the execution if they are so against it? Greg chops the heads off and tosses them aside as the headless bodies run around. Jared, who was against killing the chickens, is now holding a dead one by the legs and excited about eating a good meal.

Is it wrong to want to hit an eleven year old?

Greg is really coming around this week and helping in the kitchen and with cutting up the chicken and all. Everyone is digging dinner big time. Emilie didn't attend dinner. She simply sat in the bunk and got sad that everyone was having chicken for dinner and is getting really sick of everything around Bonanza City. Hippie.

It's cold as can be. Half the Yellow team is not in the kitchen doing their jobs including Town Council member Taylor who is a spoiled brat. When asked to come to the kitchen, she says she doesn't want to. And the water well is frozen because it is so cold. I honestly had no idea that could happen. Green team makes it happen though, especially Michael. They unfreeze the pump and get water.

Showdown time for class, jobs, and salary. A big ol' inflatable heated water slide is set up. But it's only one of the possible rewards if all four teams finish within an hour. Teams must put together a system of pipes from the windmill through an outhouse, a barrel, and other things to get the water to a waterwheel. Water is going to be shooting out the whole time to make things even more difficult. I want to be a kid again because of this show.

All four teams are moving very fast. Greg is proving to be extremely smart in this competition. Blue takes upper class! Red comes in second. Yellow comes in third with only five minutes to go and are once again the cooks. God it really sucks that Green is coming in last again because there are some seriously hard workers on that team. But now it's inevitable and they are working for the big prize. And suspense...they couldn't get it. Damn!

I feel so bad for those poor kids but everyone is still supporting them. That is a fantastic thing to see. The other prize they could have won which was revealed to them was unfreezable water pumps all over town. They're still smiling though. These kids are awesome.

Yellow is once again, and unfortunately, in the kitchen. They don't care and it's quite sad. Taylor again brings up that she is a "pageant girl" and is above washing dishes. Blue is helping Sophia with the dishes. Town Council Mike is suspicious of Greg and wonders if he simply is working for the gold star. Isn't that one of the ideas? Dur!

Some of the kids are running a pet daycare taking care of everyone's stuffed animals. CUTE! Emilie the hippie has once again locked herself in the chicken coop. Go home ya dirty hippie.

Town Council meeting and gold star talk. Greg really needs the money for college; at least he has a goal. Mike again is totally against Greg getting it and it is so because he doesn't like him, you can tell. Laurel and Mike want to give the star to Michael. Anjay and Taylor want Greg to get it. Uh-oh, tension!

DING-DING...Town Hall Meeting.

Everyone in town still approves of the work the Council is doing except for two, Savannah and Sophia. Yellow is about to be burned at the stake as everyone wants them to do their work in the kitchen.

Taylor: "We do our best and sometimes it's just too cold to get in the kitchen. Yall are just going to have to starve."

Michael speaks up again and says age is not an excuse. No-one wants to go home this week, even Emilie. Great, that means even more of her complaining and tree thumping next week. But now it is time for the gold star giveaway. Town Council confers for a minute and the winner is: Michael (Green).

He deserves it, but if Greg has another week like he did this week? Then he better win it. Michael is giving the star and money to his parents and now he's calling them to let them know. Seriously, he is one great kid. Jealousy has now set in now with Greg and he says it was disrespectful and he's going to do something about it. Dude, don't! Three more days of hard work and you can get one too.

Next week Greg lets his temper get the best of him and he is showing it. The young kids want to prove they deserve the gold star too as it looks like there's going to be some sheep wrangling. And a dust storm looks like it is going to destroy Bonanza City. This is your Captain speaking folks, and I'll see you next week.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Courtesy of Cincinnati Post

Nation of kids is creepy

WASHINGTON - When they write the cultural history of childhood in 21st- century America, I hope they leave room for a few unkind words about "Kid Nation."

CBS' latest new reality show - that wonderful oxymoron - is about 40 kids from 8 to 15 years old who are dropped into a ghost town in New Mexico with only a production crew to call their own. The kids' task, we are told in the best go-team fashion, is to "try to fix their forefathers' mistakes and build a new town that works."

Their real job, of course, is to attract viewers who want to see what happens to the "first ever kid nation." Will kids left to their own devices create a democratic idyll or a savage anarchy?

There is nothing particularly new about the conflicting images of children as innocents and children as beasts.

But the real founding fathers of "Kid Nation" leave little to chance or choice. It's the producers, not the so-called "pioneers," who determine the structure of the town called Bonanza. It's the adults who lay the cultural grid down the main street. And this makes "Kid Nation" an entry into the annals of childhood as it's now lived and argued about in America.

You see, this what the adults brought with them from Hollywood to Bonanza: competition, class and consumerism. In the very first episode, the children were directed to form four armies for color war. And they did. They were told that victory would determine their class status. And it did.

In a scenario Karl Marx couldn't have made up, the winners of the war were dubbed "upper class," the runners-up were labeled "merchants," then "cooks," and finally "laborers." The little capitalists were allowed to use their very unequal paychecks for very unequal chores to pay for goodies at the town store. The producers did everything but deny the lower income children their health coverage.

Cutthroat competition, class divisions, unrelenting consumerism. Maybe it is reality programming after all. Aren't these the basic three C's of the culture in which we are all raising children?

Parent bashing is the favorite indoor sport these days. It's behind the voyeurism that makes Supernanny popular and Britney Spears unpopular. It's why we cheered the judge assigning the sinking celebrity a parenting coach.

Ordinary parents are held responsible for protecting their children from every imaginable danger. They are fed a high-anxiety diet of horror stories about lead paint in toys, Crocs on escalators and killer cribs. If you google "danger" and "children," you get 21 million hits of everything from online predators to takeout junk food.

Yet even the most watchful parents are not immune to criticism. The latest villains are the helicopter parents. See them hover over their children's lives! Watch them pull the invisible apron strings of a cell phone, book their children's playdates and write their college entrance essays while squashing their sense of imagination. Parents even have to protect kids from overprotection.

The back story is that America has privatized child-raising. We regard children as the wholly own subsidiary and responsibility of their families. Parents, in turn, can become so absorbed in worrying about the side rails on cribs that we lose focus on the cultural environment that encases all of us. And there is no bike helmet that can protect our children's brains from the three C's.

Before it premiered, "Kid Nation" itself was charged with endangering the children by violating child labor laws and even child abuse laws. Indeed, the consent form that the parents signed is as creepy as the ones you don't read before you go into surgery. Even creepier was the scene when two homesick children cried and not one adult had the impulse to drop a camera and offer comfort.

Nevertheless, the real trouble in Bonanza is not that the cast of mini-survivors was exposed to "serious bodily injury, illness or death." It's that the children urged to build a better town (read "world'') than their forefathers were manipulated into the copycat media culture. The reward is a gold star literally worth its weight in gold: $20,000.

The only hero so far is 8-year-old Jimmy, the New Hampshire boy who had the good sense to go home. As for the rest? The children of Bonanza didn't make the rules. They inherited them. It's not a kid nation. It's our nation.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Courtesy of Reality TV Calendar

"Maybe They'll Hang 'Em"

Last week on Kid Nation, the 40 kids (ages 8-15) arrived in the abandoned ghost town of Bonanza City, New Mexico. The kids were dropped off a few miles from Bonanza City and greeted by host Jonathan Karsh. His first announcement was to tell the group that their leaders, the Town Council, would arrive shortly. The four councilmembers arrived by helicopter: Mike (age 11), Taylor (age 10), Anjay (age 12) and Laurel (age 12).

Jonathan told the council that every three days, they would award one of the kids the "gold star" trophy, worth $20,000, for being the top kid in town. Waiting for the kids were wagons filled with 40 days of supplies, including dry goods, food, and even livestock. The kids' first task was to haul the wagons and supplies to the city.

The next day, the Town Council divided he kids into four districts, and each district would be led by one of the councilmembers. Mike lead the red district, Anjay led the blue district, Taylor led the yellow district, and Laurel led the green district.

Later that day, Jonathan told the kids that they would each have assigned jobs. The jobs earn money which can then be used at the town stores and the saloon. Laborers will clean the outhouses, pick up garbage, and haul water for the entire town, for the pay of ten cents. Cooks will prepare meals for the town, do dishes and care for the livestock, for the pay of a quarter. Merchants will run the grocery and dry goods stores, and the saloon, for the pay of fifty cents. The upper class gets a dollar and has no jobs to do.

To assign the jobs, all four districts participated in the first showdown. Every three days, the districts will determine their class in another showdown. The first showdown involved carrying pumps around to place over holes that contained colored water. The first district to fill their bottles with water and carry the pump back to the finish line won the showdown. The red district came in first, followed by blue, yellow and green. The red district became the upper class, blue district the merchants, yellow the cooks, and green the laborers. Since all four districts completed the showdown in a designated amount of time, they won an award. Jonathan offered the kids the choice between seven new outhouses (they all were sharing just one outhouse) or a TV set. The council decided on the outhouses, and the majority of the kids were thrilled with their choice. After everyone got paid for the first time, they all went to visit the saloon and store and the green district soon realized that their pay would not take them very far.

When it was time for the first Town Council Meeting, Jonathan asked everyone if they were happy with the job the council was doing. Sophia was the only one to voice her frustration with the council. Her frustration was mainly due to the yellow district's cooking and cleanup. The council promised to try to do better, and Sophia seemed satisfied with their answer.

Next, Jonathan asked if anyone wanted to go home. Taylor had been homesick, but said that she was ready to stay for the remaining 36 days. Jimmy raised his hand and said that he was very homesick, and that he was scared. He decided to go home, and looked very happy as he left the meeting. The last thing was to award the gold star to one of the kids. The council awarded the gold star to Sophia, even though she had called out the council just a few minutes earlier. The kids were all stunned to learn that the gold star was more than just an award, it's also worth $20,000! Sophia was allowed to make a phone call home to tell her family about her award.

Tonight we begin on day five, and the yellow district is tending to the chickens. They're all excited to collect their first farm-fresh egg. Emilie lives on a ranch and has experience with livestock, so she's a big help to the yellow district.

The council reads some more in the old book that they found in the chapel. The book encourages them to use the chickens for more than eggs, and says that they could serve them up for dinner. The council discusses this option. Mike thinks that it's time for them to have some fresh meat. Taylor agrees, but Laurel doesn't want to kill the chickens. They decide to take a town vote.

After the kids eat.....

The first district to get the water wheel going and return to the starting point wins and will be the upper class, awarding them a dollar. The second place will be the merchants and will get fifty cents. Third place will be the cooks and will get a quarter, and the last place will be the laborers and will only receive a dime.

The showdown begins and everyone takes off running. Most of the teams form an assembly line from the piles of pipes to the pump, and start putting the pipes together. The green district is motivated to win so that they don't have to be laborers anymore. The blue district seems to be in the lead because they've got the older and stronger boys. Greg has moved from being the town butcher to the town plumber. He says that he has worked with pvc pipe, and knows how to reroute sprinklers.

Ten minutes into the showdown, the blue district is still in the lead with the red district right behind. The green district struggles to find some leaks, and the yellow district gains some ground. Blue is first to the wall of pipes, and it's obvious that Greg is leading the group. Blue and red are both almost to the end, when red springs a huge leak. Blue gets to the water wheel and it starts spinning, so they win and will be the new upper class.

The red district is still struggling with leaks, and yellow works to catch up. Green is having a difficult time and is in last place. Red makes it to their wheel next, and will be the merchants.

Green is now struggling with leaks, and there is only five minutes left if they want to win the reward. Yellow gets their wheel going, so they are the cooks again. That leaves green as the laborers again. Green now has four minutes to finish so that the town can have their reward. With one minute left, the other three districts are screaming at them to finish. Unfortunately, time runs out before they get to their water wheel and so there will be no reward.

Everyone falls silent, and a few even hug and cry. The other districts tell green that they did a good job, and there isn't any hostility for not winning the reward. Jonathan reveals that the second reward choice would have been extra water pumps, designed never to freeze.

On day seven, the job board has been changed to show the new classes. Blue and red have switched places, but yellow and green stayed the same. Green works hard cleaning the outhouses and hauling water. Yellow is supposed to cook, but as usual they're not doing anything. Taylor is leading her district in sitting around and doing nothing. The rest of the town notices that the yellow district isn't pulling their weight. Greg and some of the other blue district pitch in and help do some dishes, even though they're the upper class. Mike says that he thinks Greg is helping only because he wants the gold star.

Here's how the job board looks now:

Leading the Blue (currently the Upper Class) District is Anjay, age 12. Joining Anjay in the blue district are:

Mallory, 8

Alex, 9

Gianna, 10

Nathan, 11

Olivia, 12

Blaine, 14

Greg, 15

Migle, 13

Natasha, 13

Leading the Red (currently the Merchant) District is Mike, age 11. Joining Mike in the red district are:

Emilie, 9

Divad, 11

Guylan, 11

Jared, 11

Jasmine, 11

Madison, 11

Markelle, 12

DK, 14

Maggie, 14

Leading the Yellow (currently the Cook) District is Taylor, age 10. Joining Taylor in the yellow district are:

Cody, 9

Leila, 9

Sophie, 10

Zach, 10

Brett, 11

Colton, 11

Kelsey, 11

Randi, 11

Pharaoh, 12

Leading the Green (currently the Laborer) District is Laurel, age 12. Joining Laurel in the green district are:

Campbell, 10

Savannah, 10

Hunter, 12

Kennedy, 12

Morgan, 12

Michael, 14, who received the second gold star

Eric, 14

Sophia, 14, who received the first gold star

Jimmy, 8, was a member of the Green District, but left in week one

Mallory and Sophie set up a.....

Mallory and Sophie set up a "town daycare" to take care of people's stuffed animals. I guess they have to figure something out to occupy themselves.

Emilie spends her day hanging out with the chickens, even though she's a merchant. Colton gets her and tells her that only the cooks and upper class are allowed in the chicken coop. Emilie refuses to leave, so Colton goes to find members of the yellow district to try to force her out. She leaves, and is definitely upset. The other kids are kind of mean to her, and one of the boys says "if you want to be with the animals, go home."

The council discusses the next gold star. Taylor thinks that it should be Greg. Mike doesn't want Greg to get it, because he thinks that Greg is working only because of the gold star. He thinks that Greg is "big and wants attention" and thinks they should give the gold star to Michael. Anjay and Taylor want to give it to Greg, and Laurel and Mike want to give it to Michael.

Jonathan calls a Town Hall Meeting. He asks how many people approve of the job that the council is doing, and only two people say that they don't approve. For the second time, Sophia is unhappy with the council, and this time Savannah is too. Sophia tells Taylor that she has to get her district up and in the kitchen. Taylor shows that she's had practice answering questions from her pageant days. She says that they're trying to get up early and they try their best.

Savannah says that the green district is spending time in the kitchen, and Laurel agrees. Laurel says that the green district is doing their job and yellow's too. Taylor says that her district is doing their best, and people start yelling that they're not.

Taylor says "we're the youngest people, we don't have good cooking experience, I'm sorry you're just going to have to starve." This gets a big howl from the town. Markelle stands up and tells Taylor that Sophia is really helping her out, so she should "shut her disrespectful mouth."

Taylor keeps trying to use her district's age as an excuse. Michael tells her not to use her age as an excuse, and says that they have the potential to do a good job. Everyone cheers when he says this, and Taylor gives up and doesn't say anything else.

Jonathan asks if anyone wants to go home. Nobody says that they do, so Emilie has decided to stay. The next thing is the gold star award. Mike stands and says that they decided to give the gold star to Michael. Everyone cheers and Michael looks surprised and happy. Greg looks a little surprised, but not as mad as I thought he would be.

Michael says he's going to give the money to his parents, and goes to make his phone call and give his parents the good news. His mom is silent for a minute, and then says "oh my gosh Michael, that's an honor!" She says that they're proud of him and that it was great to talk to him.

Now that he's had a minute to think about it, Greg is now mad that he didn't get the gold star. He says that he "did the chickens, and did a hell of a lot more than Michael, it was disrespectful and I'm gonna do something about it."

Next week on Kid Nation, Greg's temper causes trouble. The younger kids step up and get to work, and a dust storm causes havoc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kids reality show shock

Exclusive by Damien Fletcher 28/09/2007

4B3CEBC5-F7CC-1CFC-ACEEFC9C81C3271B.jpg

Kid Nation

Cross Big Brother with Lord Of The Flies and you've got the world's most shocking reality TV show...

American audiences got their first taste of Kid Nation last week when it was aired on CBS.

They tuned in to watch 40 children aged between eight and 15 try to build a life for themselves in a derelict mining town.

British children's charities have already accused the producers of exploitation.

Production company Good TV Inc have dumped the kids in Bonanza City, New Mexico, to create a functioning society - with a government, laws, business and a class system, but no electricity, TV, phones or internet.

The kids have been split into teams who then compete to become "merchants", "upper class" winners, "cooks" or "labourers".

To fuel rivalry, one child is voted the winner of a gold star worth

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Courtesy of Boston Globe

Barbarians at the 'Kid Nation' gate

WHEN THEY write the cultural history of childhood in 21st-century America, I hope they leave room for a few unkind words about "Kid Nation."

CBS's latest new reality show - that wonderful oxymoron - is about 40 kids from 8 to 15 years old who are dropped into a ghost town in New Mexico with only a production crew to call their own. The kids' task, we are told in the best go-team fashion, is to "try to fix their forefathers' mistakes and build a new town that works."

Their real job, of course, is to attract viewers who want to see what happens to the "first-ever kid nation." Will kids left to their own devices create a democratic idyll or a savage anarchy?

There is nothing particularly new about the conflicting images of children as innocents and children as beasts. It's as old as mythology. It lives on in the heart of every parent who has seen her child turn from a screaming sociopath at the supermarket checkout to a philosopher king at the beach: "Who painted the sky blue?"

But the real founding fathers of "Kid Nation" leave little to chance or choice. It's the producers, not the so-called pioneers, who determine the structure of the town called Bonanza. It's the adults who lay the cultural grid down the main street. And this makes "Kid Nation" an entry into the annals of childhood as it's now lived and argued about in America.

You see, this is what the adults brought with them from Hollywood to Bonanza: competition, class, and consumerism. In the very first episode, the children were directed to form four armies for color war. And they did. They were told that victory would determine their class status. And it did.

In a scenario Karl Marx couldn't have made up, the winners of the war were dubbed "upper class," the runners-up were labeled "merchants," then "cooks," and finally "laborers." The little capitalists were allowed to use their very unequal paychecks for very unequal chores to pay for goodies at the town store. The producers did everything but deny the lower-income children their health coverage.

Cutthroat competition, class divisions, unrelenting consumerism. Maybe it is reality programming after all. Aren't these the basic three C's of the culture in which we are all raising children?

Parent bashing is the favorite indoor sport these days. It's behind the voyeurism that makes "Supernanny" popular and Britney Spears unpopular. It's why we cheered the judge assigning the sinking celebrity a parenting coach.

Ordinary parents are held responsible for protecting their children from every imaginable danger. They are fed a high-anxiety diet of horror stories about lead paint in toys, Crocs on escalators, and killer cribs. If you Google "danger" and "children," you get 21 million hits of everything from online predators to takeout junk food.

Yet even the most watchful parents are not immune to criticism. The latest villains are the helicopter parents. See them hover over their children's lives! Watch them pull the invisible apron strings of a cellphone, book their children's playdates, and write their college entrance essays while squashing their sense of imagination. Parents even have to protect children from overprotection.

The back story is that America has privatized child-raising. We regard children as the wholly owned subsidiary and responsibility of their families. Parents, in turn, can become so absorbed in worrying about the side rails on cribs that we lose focus on the cultural environment that encases all of us. And there is no bike helmet that can protect our children's brains from the three C's.

Before it premiered, "Kid Nation" itself was charged with endangering the children by violating child labor laws and even child abuse laws. Indeed, the consent form that the parents signed is as creepy as the ones you don't read before you go into surgery. Even creepier was the scene when two homesick children cried and not one adult had the impulse to drop a camera and offer comfort.

Nevertheless, the real trouble in Bonanza is not that the cast of mini-survivors was exposed to "serious bodily injury, illness or death." It's that the children urged to build a better town (read "world") than their forefathers were manipulated into the copycat media culture. The reward is a gold star literally worth its weight in gold: $20,000.

The only hero so far is 8-year-old Jimmy, the New Hampshire boy who had the good sense to go home. As for the rest? The children of Bonanza didn't make the rules. They inherited them. It's not a kid nation. It's our nation.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

THE HUFFINGTON POST

blog by Gabriel DeLahaye

8:03 PM: The title of this week's episode is "To Kill or Not to Kill?" because kids are precious and darling and innocent and blood-thirsty.

8:04: Bonanza City. The children are harvesting eggs. One kid says "that is so awesome." About an egg. It's true. Eggs are awesome. Also awesome: Sex. Driving a car. Voting. Alcohol. You always hear people say how great it is that kids can become fascinated by the tiny wonders of life, you never hear people come to their senses and say "how is that amazing egg going to pay my rent?"

8:05: Emilie (9-NV), claims that her parents own 10 acres. This I believe. She also claims that she "breaks wild mustangs." This I believe is insane bullshit. She is 9. She'd be brave to attempt breaking a My Little Pony.

8:06: In the chapel, where the "important book" left by their elders which tells them how to, for example, split into traditional red, green, blue, and yellow teams, now tells them that in order to eat a balanced diet, you can't just eat eggs, beans, and canned vegetables. If you want to have a balanced diet, you also have to kill chickens. The only thing more ridiculous than this book is the fact that it was made by underpaid production assistants.

8:10 The town council puts it to a vote on whether or not to kill a chicken. One kid yells "y'all serious?" Yes, Buffy, the Human Beat Box, I believe they are.

8:11: There is some disagreement over whether or not animals are our friends and/or we need to eat some protein (not contained in the eggs and beans the kids have been eating, apparently. "No adults" means "no dieticians"). When the decision is made to kill a chicken, with lots of primal screaming, some kids decide to lock themselves in the chicken coop until everyone agrees not to kill the chickens. Gross. Hippies are gross, you guys, but child hippies are grosser.

8:12 Emilie asks "are they gonna hang them, like they did to Saddam Hussein?" Aw, kids say the darndest things. Also, what?

8:14 Somehow, the baby hippies are coaxed out of the chicken coop and into the root beer store with the town leaders. It is agreed in the root beer store that they have to kill some chickens, for "the good of the town." Greg (15-NV) is the oldest kid in town, and the only one who exhibits signs of sociopathic behavior. He explains that he has slaughtered cows, goats, dogs, unicorns, chickens, fish, dragons, whales, centaurs, and self-esteem. He is a monster. It's actually a relief when he goes to slaughter the chickens with a hatchet rather than his teeth. Especially since so much gristle would get caught in his braces.

8:15: The chicken is slaughtered. All the kids stand around shaking and screaming. It's great.

8:16: Jared (11-GA), holds a dead chicken by its feet and says: "We sped up the natural cycle of life and death." Earlier he said something about Shakespeare and last week he quoted Martin Luther King Jr. in reference to breakfast. Jared is quickly becoming one of my favorite kids on the show. He is seriously an alien sent from outer-space who was taught to mimic humans by watching old episodes of Family Matters, and memorizing a copy of Bartlett's Quotations that one of his fellow aliens just kind of made up.

8:17: The chicken is served. I'm sure it's cooked super good with lots of delicious spices, like dirt and crayons and the longing for parentally-established boundaries.

8:22: The temperature dropped over night and all of the water in town is frozen. Their laundry is frozen in buckets of water (because the way to do laundry is to leave it sitting out in the dirt in buckets of water overnight). The pump is also frozen. There is no water and the children are all going to die. Five minutes later, everyone is in t-shirts and don't even worry about it. Thanks, false drama.

8:29: They get another Survivor-style challenge. The challenges on this show are so confusing, I guess because of how the pioneering days were so confusing? It involves something with putting together PVC pipe so that water shoots out through the top of an outhouse into a ferris wheel and under a bale of hay into a mud pit. You know, a basic challenge that every founding civilization goes through on their way to skyscrapers and global capitalism.

8:35: The green team can't get their wheel to turn, which means that the town doesn't get a bonus prize. Had they finished in the allotted hour, the children would have chosen between a 45-foot-inflatable-heated-waterslide (naturally), and water pumps for the town that are designed not to freeze. It seems like a weird choice because wouldn't you need water from the pumps to RUN the 45-foot-inflatable-heated-waterslide? Well, whatever. Ye olde timey 45-foot-inflatable-heated-waterslide once again recedes into the golden hues of history.

8:43: The teams are rearranged into their pre-fabricated caste system. Two of the girls have set up a "daycare" where they take care of other people's stuffed animals. I don't remember that part from Lord of the Flies, but maybe that's where they hide their rudimentary weapons crafted from stone and discarded shards of metal? Is the daycare actually the armory?

8:44: Emilie is locking herself in the chicken coop again. Because that is what you do when you want to get away from it all but still surround yourself with the noxious fumes of chicken poop. Some kids come over and tell her to get out and one of them says: "If you want to be with animals, go home." OH SNAP.

8:50: Town meeting. Sophia brings up the fact that yellow is not doing its job, noting in particular the time when Taylor didn't feel like working so she stayed in bed giggling. In an interview, Taylor counters with the very solid "Sophia needs to stop criticizing me. And just shut up" argument. People seem to be displeased with Taylor's leadership, which is reasonable, because she is not a leader. She is a 10-year-old beauty pageant contestant, floundering without the overbearing needling of her stage-mom. Taylor is what happens when Paris Hilton faces a panel of her peers.

8:51: Emilie decides to stay. I really wish I cared.

8:53: Michael wins the gold star instead of Greg for his ability to read inspiration speeches put together by savvy producers in search of a hero. This comes as unwelcome news to the equally manufactured villain, Greg. Michael says that he sees the potential in everyone to win the gold star, due in no small part to their participation on the TV show that distributes the gold stars. Greg chews the bones of his enemies in bitter silence.

8:54: As an additional reward, Michael gets the key to the only building in Bonanza City with a phone to call his parents. We get our second look at the 40 worst parents in the world. Kill yourself, woman.

8:55: Next week: Greg plots his revenge

(SPOILER: it involves chalk, and "Greg rules"),

a dust storm. An outhouse falls over. Oh, crap (get it?).

Edited by Yana
To make the post more kid friendly and add the spoiler tag...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Courtesy of Media Buyer Planner

'Kid Nation' Receives Lukewarm Reception

After two outings, CBS's Kid Nation has averaged a 1.8 in the kids 2-11 demo. That's more than double what CBS averaged the week ended Sept. 23 in the same demo.

The second episode, airing against a special edition of ABC's popular Dancing with the Stars, slipped 16 percent from the premiere, in that demo, to a 1.6, writes Media Life. Among the five major networks, Kid Nation ranked third for the night with kids, but it is possible the show will bounce back in its third week when Stars returns to its regular Monday and Tuesday showings.

Of course, the youngest demographic is not one that CBS is courting, and if the show slips too much among the 18-49 demo, the network is likely to yank it.

Among adults 18-49, the second outing of the show ranked second in its time slot, down 7 percent from its 2.8 opener. Among total viewers, the slip was more pronounced, down 19 percent to 7.6 million viewers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From celebrityspider.com

TOUGH LAW AND ORDER DECISIONS TO BE MADE NEXT WEEK

[Tough Law and Order Decisions Must Be Made Next Week on Kid Nation 9/28/07

DISORDER ERUPTS AMONG THE PIONEERS, FORCING THE TOWN COUNCIL TO MAKE SOME UNPOPULAR DECISIONS ABOUT LAW AND ORDER, ON "KID NATION," WEDNESDAY, OCT. 3

"Deal With It!" - Disorder erupts among the Pioneers, prompting the Town Council to make some tough decisions regarding law and order that do not sit well with everyone in Bonanza City, on KID NATION, Wednesday, Oct. 3 (8:00-9:00 PM, ET/PT) on the CBS Television Network.

The 40 Pioneers are: Alex, Anjay, Blaine, Brett, Campbell, Cody, Colton, Divad, DK, Emilie, Eric, Gianna, Greg, Guylan, Hunter, Jared, Jasmine, Jimmy, Kelsey, Kennedy, Laurel, Leila, Madison, Maggie, Mallory, Markelle, Michael, Migle, Mike, Morgan, Natasha, Nathan, Olivia, Pharaoh, Randi, Savannah, Sophia, Sophie, Taylor and Zach.

KID NATION is hosted by Jonathan Karsh and produced by Tom Forman Productions and Good TV, Inc. Tom Forman is the executive producer. Scott Einziger is the co-executive producer.

Source: CBS Press Release

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Courtesy of BuddyTV...

Spare the Jericho, Spoil the 'Kid Nation'

Kid Nation slipped strongly from its premiere this week. Down into the single digits as a matter of fact. A trend that will surely only continue in the weeks to come. This week it was a 9, next week probably a 7. Surprisingly, despite it's limited demographic appeal, a lot of critics, myself included, passed over Kid Nation as the possibility for the first canceled show of the season. It may have been one of the most missed predictions of the season. Nobody wants to see the children cry

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Courtesy of Detroit Free Press

'Kid Nation' delights family

E-mailed by Pat Larson, Troy: "We love 'Kid Nation' -- and I've been reading so many bad reviews! We find it to be 'Survivor' without the sex, swearing and silicone. Our kids were fascinated and it's great to see a show we can all watch together and talk about later."

Captain Video says: It's not the G-rated, family acceptable content that stirred all the controversy and negative reaction, Pat. It was allegations of child labor law hanky panky and other supposed missteps by the "Kid Nation" producers in making the series. But " 'Survivor' without sex, swearing and silicone" sounds like a pretty groovy promotional catchphrase. Have you contacted CBS?

E-mailed by Monica Craig, Lathrup Village: "I had no intention of watching the show 'Chuck,' but after reading your review about it I decided to watch. It was GREAT! Thanks so much! I plan to continue to watch. What a great pre-show for 'Heroes.' "

CV says: Yep, Monica, "Chuck" is a clever, lighthearted geek chic treat. Glad to be of service.

E-mailed by Mark Bustraan, retired iron worker: "If you can't stand the 'Two and a Half Men' show that's fine. But it is No. 1. Maybe you should go into a cage by yourself. This show is stupid funny -- why would one not like the show?"

CV says: Hey, Mark, my wife, Col. Jane Video, thinks you have a great idea with that cage suggestion. As for "Two and a Half Men," I remain clueless to the comic appeal of a series that is often little more than a nonstop string of leering, puerile sex jokes. And they aren't even leering, puerile funny sex jokes.

Voicemail from Ella Nagy, Dearborn: "I watched the 'Burn Notice' season finale and they said it would be back next summer. I thought the TV season was different. What's happening with these new series and seasons?"

CV says: It's just the way of the modern TV world, Ella. And that's not a bad thing necessarily. Because as they proved again this summer, basic cable networks like USA ("Burn Notice"), FX ("Damages"), TNT ("Saving Grace") and AMC ("Mad Men") continue to create new and often imaginative series to give us additional quality viewing options. But those cable series, because of economics and the preferences of stars like Kyra Sedgwick ("The Closer"), limit themselves to seasons of 12 or so episodes, compared to the 22-24 episodes for broadcast network series on ABC, CBS or NBC. Just be happy that cool spy guy caper "Burn Notice" broke out to become a very pleasant summer season hit and got renewed.

E-mailed by former Southfield resident Bill Prady, executive producer of "The Big Bang Theory" (CBS): "Aw gee, Mike. Half the critics liked us and half the critics hated us. But why did the paper that my folks read back in my Motor City hometown have to be among the latter?"

CV says: The TV critic geography roulette wheel spun and you lost, Bill. Sorry. But tell your parents they're more than welcome to rattle my cage with cranky e-mails and voicemails. Or they can just stick a few pins in the universal TV critic voodoo doll.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×