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Star Trek (Original Series)


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#1
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FROM Sci-Fi Wire
12:00 AM, 01-JUNE-05



Chekov Treks To The Web

Walter Koenig, who played Ensign Chekov in the original Star Trek series, told SCI FI Wire that he is planning on starring in a fan-based Internet short film that will give some finality to the character he's been associated with for nearly 40 years.

"This is a unique opportunity to give some dimension to my character," Koenig said in an interview at Enigma Con at the University of California, Los Angeles, over the weekend. "I was most unhappy ... that there wasn't a whole lot of dimension to the character. It was push buttons and say 'Warp factor five' with as many inflections as possible—and with an accent."

Koenig added that fans have approached him to do an in-depth story about Chekov, and Koenig said he found an actor who looked eerily like himself when he first boarded the Enterprise. "He will play me in my younger days, and I'll play the character as older, of course," Koenig said. "It will be a real gut-wrencher. If I perform properly, it will work."

On board to write the script is D.C. Fontana, who wrote some of Koenig's favorite stories in the original series, including "This Side of Paradise," "Friday's Child" and "Journey to Babel" and also worked on the animated series he voiced in 1973. Koenig said that Paramount Studios is on board, allowing the production to take place as long as it is distributed for free on the Internet. He expects it to be available in January.

"Indeed it is fan-driven, but there are professionals in this business who are fans and willing to work on it," Koenig said. "It is cathartic for me and an opportunity to reveal to the audience and the fans who this man is. I want there to be some justification for all the attention and acclaim that has been bestowed on us over these four decades."

Koenig added: "I'm doing it for fun and a sense of closure. It vindicates something about myself."



'Star Trek's' Scotty Remains Face Final Frontier


James 'Scotty' Doohan

LOS ANGELES, California - Evidently "Star Trek" actor James 'Scotty' Doohan took the catch phrase "beam me up" very seriously -- his cremated remains will be launched into space in accordance with his last wishes. Doohan, who portrayed feisty chief engineer Montgomery 'Scotty' Scott on the original "Star Trek" television series, died July 20 at age 85.

Commercial space flight operator Space Services Inc. will launch the late actor's remains into space aboard its Explorers Flight on December 6. A company spokeswoman said the remains of more than 120 others will be aboard the flight, including those of Mareta West, the astrogeologist who determined the site for the first spacecraft landing on the moon.

In addition, Space Services will launch the ashes of an unidentified astronaut. Space Services spokeswoman, Susan Schonfeld declined to identify the astronaut whose cremated remains will be launched into space. She said the name would be announced the day of the launch.



The crew of the Enterprise on 'Star Trek'

One of Scotty's chief functions on the show was to operate the devise used to transport fellow crew members onto the starship Enterprise from other space vessels or planets, often in response to a request to "beam" them aboard. The phrase entered the pop cultre as "beam me up, Scotty," though it was never uttered exactly that way on the show.

To mark the flight into his final frontier, Doohan's family will hold a service for fans on a 60-acre site near Vandenberg Air Force Base north of Los Angeles the day of the launch to pay tribute to him. Some fans are expected to attend in the formal white suit of a Star Fleet commander.



NASA astronaut Mario Runco and James 'Scotty' Doohan in
the Shuttle Mission Simulator at the Johnson Space Center.


"I can't think of a more fitting send-off than having some of his fans attend this, his final journey," his widow, Wende Doohan, said in an open invitation to the service. "Star Trek" creator Gene Roddenberry also had his remains shot into space after his death in 1991. They returned to Earth in 2002, Schonfeld said.

Doohan's cremated remains will be packed into a special tube that is ejected from the rocket and expected to orbit Earth for about 50 to 200 years before plunging into the planet's atmosphere and burning up. Fans can post tributes to Doohan at the Space Services Web site Space Services. Those messages will be digitized, packed with 'Scotty' and blasted into space . . . his final frontier.


#2
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'Star Trek' Star James Doohan Dead at 85



(AP) James Doohan, the burly chief engineer of the Starship Enterprise in the original "Star Trek" TV series and movies who responded to the command "Beam me up, Scotty," died Wednesday. He was 85. Doohan died at 5:30 a.m. at his Redmond, Wash., home with his wife of 28 years, Wende, at his side, Los Angeles agent and longtime friend Steve Stevens said. The cause of death was pneumonia and Alzheimer's disease, he said. He had said farewell to public life in August 2004, a few months after being diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease.



The Canadian-born Doohan was enjoying a busy career as a character actor when he auditioned for a role as an engineer in a new space adventure on NBC in 1966. A master of dialects from his early years in radio, he tried seven different accents. "The producers asked me which one I preferred," Doohan recalled 30 years later. "I believed the Scot voice was the most commanding. So I told them, 'If this character is going to be an engineer, you'd better make him a Scotsman.'" The series, which starred William Shatner as Capt. James T. Kirk and Leonard Nimoy as the enigmatic Mr. Spock, attracted an enthusiastic following of science fiction fans, especially among teenagers and children, but not enough ratings power. NBC canceled it after three seasons.

When the series ended in 1969, Doohan found himself typecast as Montgomery Scott, the canny engineer with a burr in his voice. In 1973, he complained to his dentist, who advised him: "Jimmy, you're going to be Scotty long after you're dead. If I were you, I'd go with the flow." "I took his advice," said Doohan, "and since then everything's been just lovely."

"Star Trek" continued in syndication both in the United States and abroad, and its following grew larger and more dedicated. In his later years, Doohan attended 40 "Trekkie" gatherings around the country and lectured at colleges. The huge success of George Lucas' "Star Wars" in 1977 prompted Paramount Pictures, which had produced "Star Trek" for television, to plan a movie based on the series. The studio brought back the TV cast and hired director Robert Wise. "Star Trek: The Motion Picture" was successful enough to spawn five sequels.

The powerfully built Doohan, a veteran of D-Day in Normandy, spoke frankly in 1998 about his employer and his TV commander. "I started out in the series at basic minimum_ plus 10 percent for my agent. That was added a little bit in the second year. When we finally got to our third year, Paramount told us we'd get second-year pay! That's how much they loved us."

He accused Shatner of hogging the camera, adding: "I like Captain Kirk, but I sure don't like Bill. He's so insecure that all he can think about is himself."

James Montgomery Doohan was born March 3, 1920, in Vancouver, British Columbia, youngest of four children of William Doohan, a pharmacist, veterinarian and dentist, and his wife Sarah. As he wrote in his autobiography, "Beam Me Up, Scotty," his father was a drunk who made life miserable for his wife and children. At 19, James escaped the turmoil at home by joining the Canadian army, becoming a lieutenant in artillery. He was among the Canadian forces that landed on Juno Beach on D-Day. "The sea was rough," he recalled. "We were more afraid of drowning than the Germans."

The Canadians crossed a minefield laid for tanks; the soldiers weren't heavy enough to detonate the bombs. At 11:30 that night, he was machine-gunned, taking six hits: one that took off his middle right finger (he managed to hide the missing finger on screen), four in his leg and one in the chest. Fortunately the chest bullet was stopped by his silver cigarette case. After the war Doohan on a whim enrolled in a drama class in Toronto. He showed promise and won a two-year scholarship to New York's famed Neighborhood Playhouse, where fellow students included Leslie Nielsen, Tony Randall and Richard Boone. His commanding presence and booming voice brought him work as a character actor in films and television, both in Canada and the United States. Oddly, his only other TV series besides "Star Trek" was another space adventure, "Space Command," in 1953.

Doohan's first marriage to Judy Doohan produced four children. He had two children by his second marriage to Anita Yagel. Both marriages ended in divorce. In 1974 he married Wende Braunberger, and their children were Eric, Thomas and Sarah, who was born in 2000, when Doohan was 80.

In a 1998 interview, Doohan was asked if he ever got tired of hearing the line "Beam me up, Scotty." "I'm not tired of it at all," he replied. "Good gracious, it's been said to me for just about 31 years. It's been said to me at 70 miles an hour across four lanes on the freeway. I hear it from just about everybody. It's been fun."


Poor Scottie ... he was a joy and suffered much in the end. This is a sad day! sad.gif

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FROM TV GUIDE: Entertainment News

[b]THE FINAL FRONTIER: James Doohan, famous for playing chief engineer (and later, Captain) Montgomery "Beam me up, Scotty!" Scott in the original Star Trek series and subsequent movies, passed away on Wednesday morning at his Redmond, Wash., home, with his wife, Wende, at his side. The cause of death was Alzheimer's-related pneumonia. He was 85. Born in Canada (a master of dialects, he affected his brogue for Star Trek), Doohan was working as a character actor when he auditioned for Trek in 1966. Although NBC axed the series after three seasons, syndicated repeats led Kirk, Spock, McCoy, Scotty et al to amass scores of fans and thus live on for decades, including in six big-screen adventures. Doohan, a veteran of D-Day, was honored with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame last August (in what he had announced as his final public appearance), and is credited with creating the first broad strokes of Trek's Klingon language (for Star Trek: The Motion Picture).

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FROM Sci-Fi Wire

Trek's Doohan Dies At 85

James Doohan, who played chief engineer Montgomery "Scotty" Scott in the original Star Trek and subsequent films, died early July 20 at his Redmond, Wash., home, the Associated Press reported. He was 85.

Doohan died at 5:30 a.m., with his wife of 28 years, Wende, at his side, Los Angeles agent and longtime friend Steve Stevens told the wire service. The cause of death was pneumonia and Alzheimer's disease, he said.

Doohan was born March 3, 1920, in Vancouver, B.C. Doohan was enjoying a busy career as a character actor when he auditioned for a role as an engineer in a new space adventure on NBC in 1966. A master of dialects from his early years in radio, he tried seven different accents.

"The producers asked me which one I preferred," Doohan recalled 30 years later, the AP reported. "I believed the Scot voice was the most commanding. So I told them, 'If this character is going to be an engineer, you'd better make him a Scotsman.'"

When Star Trek ended in 1969, Doohan found himself typecast as Scotty. But Star Trek continued in syndicated TV both in the United States and abroad, and its following grew larger and more dedicated. In his later years, Doohan attended 40 fan gatherings around the country and lectured at colleges. He eventually reprised the role in six Star Trek movies.

In a 1998 interview, Doohan was asked if he ever got tired of hearing the line "Beam me up, Scotty."

"I'm not tired of it at all," he replied. "Good gracious, it's been said to me for just about 31 years. It's been said to me at 70 miles an hour across four lanes on the freeway. I hear it from just about everybody. It's been fun."

#5
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'Star Trek' Actor George Takei Comes Out


George 'Sulu' Takei

George Takei, who as helmsman Sulu steered the Starship Enterprise through three television seasons and six movies, has come out as a homosexual in the current issue of Frontiers, a biweekly Los Angeles magazine covering the gay and lesbian community. Takei said on his new onstage role as psychologist Martin Dysart in "Equus," helped inspire him to publicly discuss his sexuality.

Takei described the character as a "very contained but turbulently frustrated man." The play opened Wednesday, October 26, at the David Henry Hwang Theater in Los Angeles, the same day that Frontiers magazine featured a story on Takei's coming out. The 68-year-old actor said he and his partner, Brad Altman, have been together for 18 years.

The current social and political climate also motivated Takei's disclosure, he said. "The world has changed from when I was a young teen feeling ashamed for being gay," Takei explained. "The issue of gay marriage is now a political issue. That would have been unthinkable when I was young."



George 'Sulu' Takei

Takei, a Japanese-American who lived in a U.S. internment camp from age 4 to 8, said he grew up feeling ashamed of his ethnicity and sexuality. He likened prejudice against gays to racial segregation. "It's against basic decency and what American values stand for," he said.

Takei joined the "Star Trek" cast in 1966 as Hikaru Sulu, a character he played for three seasons on television and in six subsequent films. He received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in 1986.

A community activist, Takei ran for the Los Angeles City Council in 1973. He serves on the advisory committee of the California Civil Liberties Public Education Program and is chairman of East West Players, the theater company producing "Equus."


#6
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Mr. Sulu Boldly Coming Out


George Takei in a scene on 'The Young and The Restless' featuring
(L-R) Kristoff St. John, Takei and Victoria Rowell.


George Takei has boldly gone where no Star Trek star has gone before: He's come out. In so many words. "You know, it's not really coming out," Takei says in the November 22 issue of the Los Angeles-based gay and lesbian magazine, Frontiers. "It's more like a long, long walk through what began as a narrow corridor that starts to widen."

In the interview, Takei, forever Mr. Sulu of the U.S.S. Enterprise, notes that he has been "open" about his homosexuality for years--to family, and to friends. "But I have not talked to the press," he says. "In that sense, maybe that's another opening of the corridor there."

Frontiers editor Alexander Cho says Takei's camp initiated the interview with a phone call from a close friend who said the Trek icon, at 68, was ready to talk publicly about his private life. "I think it's very important," Cho says of Takei's disclosure. "We know his influence far beyond Star Trek."



George 'Sulu' Takei

Key to the story, says Cho, who conducted the interview, is that, in the age of the gay marriage debate, Takei offers "positive images of gay couples." The actor has been in a relationship with Brad Altman, heretofore identified as 'my manager' on Takei's Website, for 18 years.

When the time came for Takei to do the interview, Cho says, the sci-fi legend was "most definitely comfortable." The latest issue of Frontiers can be found online at their website, Frontiers Publishing. To see the entire conversation with the veteran stage and screen actor, click on Passion Play.

In the magazine, Takei likens going public with his sexuality to overcoming the "shame" he felt for having lived in Japanese-American internment camps during World War II. "I didn't want to talk about being in an internment camp," Takei says. "They would ask me, where was I? I would say I was far away . . . But I never went into details."



George 'Sulu' Takei

According to Takei, his attitude changed when he learned what normal was. "The large popular normality is that rigid, constrained normality," Takei says in Frontiers. "But there's another natural normality. And you come to realize, 'This is who I am. And by gum, I'm not going to let it be a constraint!'"

In the interview, Takei takes a swipe at fellow Hollywood denizen turned California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger. Takei calls the 'Terminator' a "dangerous politician" for his recent veto of a state gay marriage bill.

Takei faced challenges of the intergalactic variety as the Enterprise's navigator on the original 1966-69 TV series. He went on to appear in the first six big-screen Trek movies. Last seen in a Starfleet uniform on a 1996 episode of "Star Trek: Voyager," Takei currently is starring on the Los Angeles stage in "Equus."


#7
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Couresty of: TV GUIDE, ENTERTAINMENT NEWS

THE TREK CONTINUES:
The G4 cable channel is in talks to acquire syndication rights to the original Star Trek series, as well as the spin-off Star Trek: The Next Generation. Per the Hollywood Reporter, this move is part of an effort to redefine the "video game" network (whose name might even change as well) as having even more appeal and offerings for dateless guys on Friday nights.

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Courtesy of: ZAP2IT

Original 'Trek' Ventures to TV Land
Network will mark show's 40th anniversary in September

August 10 2006


William Shatner as Capt. James T. KirkTV Land is going where, well, quite a few networks have gone before, acquiring rights to the original "Star Trek" series.

The iconic sci-fi show will join TV Land's regular rotation in November, but the classic-television network will get an early start on the voyages of the starship Enterprise on Friday, Sept. 8 -- the 40th anniversary of the show's premiere on NBC.

That night, TV Land will show four episodes from the series, including "The Man Trap," the episode that began the series on Sept. 8, 1966.

"'Star Trek' forever changed the landscape of television and science fiction, and to this day remains a cornerstone of pop culture," says Larry Jones, president of TV Land. "It continues to attract passionate fans, and we are thrilled to mark this monumental anniversary on TV Land."

In addition to the premiere, TV Land will show the fan-favorite episodes "City on the Edge of Forever," in which Kirk (William Shatner) and Spock (Leonard Nimoy) time-travel to 1930s New York, and "The Trouble with Tribbles," featuring the little fuzzballs that take over the Enterprise. The anniversary marathon will conclude with "Plato's Stepchildren," which featured the first interracial kiss, between Kirk and Uhura (Nichelle Nichols), ever shown on television.

"Star Trek" will begin airing regularly on TV Land on Nov. 17. Episodes will also be available online on a new broadband channel at TVLand.com.

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Courtesy of: TV GUIDE, INSIDER

Exclusive! "New" Star Trek Is Set on Stunning

by Michael Logan


Behold Star Trek's "new" Enterprise.

Star Trek purists, take a deep breath! On Sept. 16, the iconic ‘60s series will return to syndication for the first time since 1990, but with a startling difference: All 79 episodes are being digitally remastered with computer-generated effects not possible when Gene Roddenberry created the show 40 years ago. The news could cause Roddenberry loyalists to have a collective cow, but the longtime Trek staffers in charge of the makeover say they're honoring the late maestro's vision, not changing it.

"We're taking great pains to respect the integrity and style of the original," says Michael Okuda, who spent 18 years as a scenic-art supervisor on Star Trek films and spin-offs. "Our goal is to always ask ourselves: What would Roddenberry have done with today's technology?" Okuda's teammates on the two-year project are his wife, Denise Okuda, with whom he's authored several Trek reference books, and 14-year Trek production vet David Rossi.

The upgraded episodes — to be shown out of order and one per week — will kick off with "Balance of Terror," a big fan favorite "that gives us a chance to really show off the ‘new' Enterprise," says Okuda. "The exterior of the ship now has depth and detail, and it will fly more dynamically." ( Click here for a larger version of the image at left.) Painted backdrops will also be brought to life: Once-empty star bases will have CGI people milling about, while static alien landscapes have been given slow-moving clouds and shimmering water. Okuda notes that a view of Earth in the 1966 episode "Miri" has been "replaced with a more accurate image, now that we've gone into deep space and looked back at ourselves."

Trek's opening theme is also getting an overhaul: The music has been re-recorded in stereo with a bigger orchestra, and a new singer has been hired to wail those famous but wordless vocals. And goofs will be corrected: In "The Naked Time," there was no beam coming out of Scotty's phaser when he tried to cut through the bulkhead outside Engineering. Now there is.

Star Trek fans, pick up the new TV Guide to see what William Shatner and Leonard Nimoy have to say about the series' 40th anniversary.

#10
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Courtesy of: TV GUIDE, ENTERTAINMENT NEWS

The "New" Trek: Burning Questions Answered!
To mark the 40th anniversary of Star Trek's TV debut, John Nogawski, President of CBS Paramount Domestic Television, and visual-effects producers Dave Rossi and Michael Okuda held a Wednesday conference call with reporters. The hot topic, of course, was the digital remastering of, and CGI enhancements being made to, the original series (as first reported here at TVGuide.com). The highlights, in brief:

• CGI tweaks are being made to both the full- and syndicated-length versions of all 79 episodes, and in both standard and 16:9 formats.
• Ranging in number from 15 to 70 per episode, the CGI enhancements at most amount to "maybe a minute and a half" in screen time.
• There will be no plot modifications made along the way, akin to E.T. replacing rifles with walkie-talkies.
• The original original series will continue airing on G4 and TV Land for "a year or two," until remastering/CGI work is completed on all 79 episodes. The enhanced episodes start airing Sept. 16 on over-the-air syndication; check TVGuide.com listings or StarTrek.com for channels/times as that date nears.
• Though the changes are being made with an eye to HDTV broadcasts, many of the 200-plus syndicating stations are simply not equipped to air the "new" Trek in that format. Still, the 4:3 standard version is promised to be "unbelievably gorgeous."
• J.J. Abrams' big-screen revisiting of Star Trek played no role in the decision to update the series. (And to the best of Nogawski's knowledge, a completed Trek film script does not yet exist.)
• As best as I could surmise, Raven Snook, there are no plans to do any such things as giving tribbles eyes and teeth. (Keep 'em cute, I say!)
Posted by Matt Mitovich 09/6/2006 1:55 PM

#11
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Why would they do that ? I am a big fan and I feel it should stay as it is in its purest form.Who cares if in an episode there are little bloopers or mistakes?Why fix what isnt broken?And why change the original theme song?Thats why its a classic it should be preserved in its true formJMO

#12
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I agree some things should just be left as they are. The original was great the way it was no need for change.

#13
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Thanx Tracks finally a voice of reason in the masses smile.gif Thankfully I have the original series on dvd.In it pure form.The way it should be.

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Courtesy of: TV GUIDE, INTERVIEWS & FEATURES

George Takei Takes on Star Trek's Sulu, Howard Stern and Other Heroes

by Tim Williams


George Takei, Star Trek: The Animated Series

William Shatner may get more attention for his exploits as a nutty attorney and a gyrating game-show host, but these days the hippest Star Trek vet is, inarguably, George Takei. The former helmsman of the <i>USS Enterprise</i> has gone boldly where no man has gone before as the "official" announcer of Howard Stern's uncensored Sirius Satellite Radio show. There, as a guest, he fields some good-natured jokes relating to his recent coming out of the closet. But the actor often turns the table on the shock jock by moving the chat to loftier concerns like gay rights, the war in Iraq or modern architecture. Star Trek fans, of course, want more of Takei as Sulu, and they got it this week with the DVD release of Star Trek: The Animated Series. This '70s cartoon copy of the sci-fi classic is what got the actor reminiscing with TVGuide.com about those who've been important to his never-ending voyage.

TVGuide.com: Tell me about the origins of the animated Star Trek series.
George Takei:
Actually, when they first got the project together, Nichelle [Nichols] and I were not asked to participate. When Leonard [Nimoy] learned of that, he said to the producers, "Then you're not interested in having me, because one of the key pillars of Star Trek is diversity and people of different cultures working together. And on this show, the two people that most represent that are Nichelle and George. If they're not part of it, then I don't want to be part of it." Leonard used his clout, because they absolutely needed Leonard, and we were called in to do our voices on the series. This just shows how Leonard is truly a human being with great integrity.

TVGuide.com: What do you think about the animated series, looking at it today?
Takei:
The animated version is not too different from the real-life version in its, how do I say this, "charmingly cheesy quality." [Laughs] Sometimes even the [cartoon] actors are as wooden as they were in our original show.... Oh, I shouldn't have said that. [Laughs]

TVGuide.com: You've become a semiregular on the Howard Stern Radio Show. What do you think of him?
Takei:
I have enormous respect and admiration for Howard, because to be able to have the guts, particularly in this political climate, to really practice freedom of speech is a rare thing. As someone who grew up in two American internment camps, I particularly cherish the freedom of speech.

TVGuide.com: You take some ribbing on the show for being openly gay. Did Star Trek fans ever have a negative reaction to your being out?
Takei:
There was that two percent that said I've ruined their love for Star Trek and Sulu, and [there were] those few religious extremists that started quoting the Bible and [saying] how dare I — an actor — tarnish the biblical truth that Star Trek was trying to convey to the audience. But the majority [response] was overwhelmingly positive. In fact, a lot of Howard Stern's listeners have written me saying that they never really thought about the issue of gay rights before, but that, after having heard me speak on it, they now support equality for gays and lesbians.

TVGuide.com: You recently participated in a brutal roast of William Shatner on Comedy Central. Where do you stand with Shatner?
Takei:
Well, Bill is a complicated, fascinating and charismatic guy, but he also has his blind spot; he just doesn't seem to see how obsessively self-involved he is. When we do conventions together, I keep thinking to myself, "Why are you so rude to the fans?" He doesn't even put on some facade for the people who've waited in line and paid good money; he just keeps his head down and says, "Next" — not even looking at them. It's just some human contact they want, and it's just plain dumb of him. But I don't know how Bill thinks — he's absolutely unfathomable. He can be so charming and gracious, but I see it's patently put on when he wants something from you.

TVGuide.com: What's up next for you?
Takei:
Oh, my, I’m playing Hiro Nakamura's father in the show Heroes. I just did the first episode, and it's a two-part cliff-hanger. Also, I'm intensely memorizing the lines for a play that I'm doing in February in San José, called Yankee Dawg You Die; and I did a film with Tom Hanks called The Great Buck Howard. Oh, and I just completed a webcast version of the Star Trek series that will be up in March, where a [young] Sulu goes to a planet and ages 30 years in three minutes. I didn't need any makeup to do that. [Laughs]. Let's just say it was all the power of acting.

#15
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I'm so excited for the animated series I cant wait to get it and also great interview.Warp speed Mr Sulu smile.gif

#16
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Without a doubt, one of the greatest TV series of all time despite Shatner's bad acting.

BTW, the cell phone was invented on Star Trek, some 20 years before the first one ever appeared on the planet earth. Maybe they left one behind in one of their Time travel episodes in 1967.

#17
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I agree,poor Willy but that's why we love ya!Very good point Echo!

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Star Trek's Scotty beamed up in final space voyage

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Courtesy of: TV GUIDE, ENTERTAINMENT NEWS

Ashes of Star Trek's Scotty beam down, go missing

Thu May 10, 3:48 PM ET


'Spaceloft XL', carrying the remains of James Doohan, the actor who played Scottie on Star Trek, successfully launches in Truth or Consequences, New Mexico April 28, 2007. A search team continues to look for a rocket carrying ashes of Doohan almost two weeks after it hurtled to the edge of space from New Mexico, the company behind the launch said on Thursday.

REUTERS/Jessica RinaldiPHOENIX (Reuters) - Beaming him up was the easy part: the problem was transporting him back to Earth.

A search team continues to look for a rocket carrying ashes of the actor James Doohan, who played Scotty on "Star Trek," almost two weeks after it hurtled to the edge of space from New Mexico, the company behind the launch said on Thursday.

Remains of the Canadian-born actor, who died two years ago at the age of 85, blasted off from a remote launch site on April 29 carrying a payload that included the ashes of astronaut Gordon Cooper and several experiments.

A spokeswoman for Houston-based Space Services Inc., which organized the "memorial spaceflight," said the telephone-pole sized rocket descended by parachute into a rugged area that a search team has repeatedly failed to reach.

"The terrain is very mountainous; it's not somewhere that you can walk or drive to. My understanding is that it will take some time to get up into there," Susan Schonfeld told Reuters by telephone.

"They know the general location, and we have the utmost confidence that they will recover it."

Schonfeld said the search had been hampered by "horrendous" weather in the desert state, but expected the Up Aerospace Spaceloft XL craft to be recovered in coming days.

Doohan played the starship Enterprise's chief engineer Montgomery Scott in the original 1966-1969 Star Trek television series.

He inspired the legendary catch phrase "Beam me up, Scotty" -- even though it was never actually uttered on the show.

Hundreds of spectators clapped and cheered as his ashes roared aloft along with those of some 200 other people, including astronaut Gordon Cooper, who first went into space in 1963. Cooper died in 2004 at age 77.

Space Services Inc. charges $495 to send a portion of a person's ashes into suborbital space.

In 1997, the company blasted the remains of "Star Trek" creator Gene Roddenberry into space.

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