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Survivor: Cook Islands

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Courtesy fo: REALITY TV MAGAZINE

CBS Outernet Campaign Includes Survivor Terry Deitz

terry_deitz_airplane.jpg

CBS has implemented an innovative marketing campaign this season to attract viewers to its fall programming via the 'Outernet' -- finding intrusive ways to reach viewers through exclusive partnerships that expose CBS to consumers outside their homes, during their daily routine or while traveling. By utilizing the 'Outernet,' CBS is finding new platforms for programming and promotion as well as unique ways for advertisers to engage with CBS content.

CBS 2006/2007 OUTERNET marketing initiatives involving reality TV include:

PILOTS ON PILOTS: Former "Survivor" and American Airlines Airline pilot Terry Deitz introduces the CBS pilots, THE CLASS and SHARK to passengers on American Airlines flights this September through CBS' "Eye On American" original programming. The two CBS television pilots will premiere "in the air" before they are officially broadcast "on the air."

CBS PROMOBILE TOUR: The Aldrich family from Peoria, Illinois is currently traveling cross-country this summer in an AMAZING RACE themed motor home sponsored by CBS. The RV is wrapped in Amazing Race signage and the family has been armed with promotional material about the show's new time period which they will hand out to crowds at major events.

Posted by Joe Reality on July 17, 2006 at 08:21 PM

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Found out today that Survivor: Cook Island starts Thursday September 14 at 8P Eastern on CBS.

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Courtesy of: MEDIAWEEK

CBS to Stream for Free Next-Day Episodes of Top Shows

Mike Shields

AUGUST 15, 2006 -

Following ABC's much publicized move last spring to feature full-length episodes of several of its biggest prime-time hits on its Web site, CBS has announced that starting in September, it too will begin offering fans the ability to stream next-day episodes of seven of its top shows for free on its brodaband Web channel innertube. Included will be all three versions of CSI, Survivor, Numb3rs, NCIS and the yet-to-debut Jericho.

Each show will carry a limited amount of advertising, according to CBS. Most episodes will be available on the site for one month after their original air date, while episodes of Survivor and Jericho will remain online all season.

CBS launched innertube back in May of this year. Up until now, the Web site has featured mostly supplemental video content tied to existing CBS series, with the promise of several original shows to debut, including the upcoming dating series Hook Me Up.

Now, the site is likely to receive a major traffic boost with the arrival of shows like CSI, which is still one of the highest rated series on TV.

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Thank youuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu boiler!!

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Looks like there are 4 teams and they have been seperated by nationality.

Red: Spanish

Yellow: African Americans

Blue: Whites

Green: Asians

Sorry if I was not politically correct I mean no disrespect. :)

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Courtesy of: TV GUIDE, ENTERTAINMENT NEWS

Survivor's Amazing Races Ploy Is Official

As predicted, Jeff Probst announced on Wednesday's The Early Show that the tribes of Survivor: Cook Islands (premiering Sept. 14) will be divided into four groups: whites, African-Americans, Asians and Hispanics. Just like my high school's cafeteria.

Posted by Matt Mitovich 08/23/2006 10:25 AM

..................................

Courtesy of: REALITYBLURRED

Jeff Probst says 85 percent of racially split Cook Islands cast was recruited

After Survivor decided to cast a more ethnically diverse group, and then split them into tribes by race, the show had to recruit most of the cast, Jeff Probst tells asap

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yeah but the changed some names on me after I posted them...grrrr have to go back redo some.

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Courtesy of: CBS, SURVIVOR

hero.jpg

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The Early Show Aug. 23

Controversial New 'Survivor'

Racial Twist In New 'Survivor'

Scroll down until you see the headlines.

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A Racy Twist for "Survivor" By Gina Serpe

1 hour, 12 minutes ago

Some may call it exploiting racial tensions. CBS calls it darn good television.

ADVERTISEMENT

Jeff Probst popped in on The Early Show Wednesday morning, confirming the reports that the 20 castaways for Survivor: Cook Islands will be grouped by race, with competitors divided into four tribes consisting of whites, blacks, Asians and Hispanics.

Apparently, "separate but equal" holds only the warmest of connotations for Mark Burnett.

Like a good host, Probst had nothing but praise for the producers' controversial brainchild, calling the exercise in segregation a valuable social experiment, rather than a stunt to dig up some controversy--and raise ratings.

"The idea for this actually came from the criticism that Survivor was not ethnically diverse enough, because for whatever reason, we always have a low number of minority applicants apply for the show," Probst said.

"So we set out and said, 'Let's turn this criticism into creative for the show.' And I think it fits perfectly with what Survivor does, which is, it is a social experiment. And this is adding another layer to that experiment, which is taking the show to a completely different level."

Different level, yes. Good level, still to be determined.

"If I had been a producer of this show, it is not an idea I would have come up with or given approval to," Robert Thompson, director of the Center for the Study of Popular Television at Syracuse University, told E! Online. "It's like a return back to segregated leagues in sports. The unseemly interest this will invite certainly is not worth the dramatic elements it's going to bring."

"To the less-than-open minded person, it is very easy to trash us," Burnett explained to Entertainment Weekly. "But we're smart enough to not make it negative. We're smart enough to have gotten rid of every racist person in casting."

Though more to the point, the producers haven't and can't weed out every racially sensitive person in their audience who may take offense to the seemingly archaic, and potentially socially irresponsible, division.

While the 43-year-old host admitted that the players themselves had "mixed reactions" to the racial separation, he made clear that the division was not meant to incite any controversy, add to the tension during the competition or simply be viewed as a gimmick.

"Our original idea was simply to have the most ethnically diverse group of people on TV. It wasn't until we got to casting and started noticing this theme of ethnic pride that we started thinking, 'Wow, if culture is still playing such a big part in these people's lives, that's our idea. Let's divide them based on ethnicity,' " he said.

Though not everyone is as excited about the idea as Probst and his Survivor crew.

"It sounds like a gimmick a lot of people are going to have real issues as to the taste of," Thompson said.

Referencing Burnett's previous experiments on Survivor and The Apprentice to divide teams by boys vs. girls and, more recently on the latter, by street smarts vs. book smarts, Thompson said that "these things don't often work so well in less dicey situations."

And any publicity is good publicity, right?

"As far as getting some attention, getting it talked about again, this'll do it," Thompson said. "Survivor is a great game. It's the gold standard of reality TV. But nobody seems to talk about it anymore."

Or watch it.

Survivor: Cook Islands will be the reality show's 13th installment and comes on the heels of the least watched season in the series' history. Despite garnering an Emmy nod for Best Reality Competition, Survivor: Panama--Exile Island, which split the tribes based on gender and age, averaged a franchise-low 16.8 million viewers. Hence the latest drastic measure.

CBS Entertainment president Nina Tassler told EW that while she was hesitant to give the go-ahead on the "risky idea," she finally relented, saying it was the logical next step in "a show that explores social politics."

"It's not just 18 white people," Probst told the magazine. "Suddenly you have new slang, new rituals--people doing things like making fire in ways that haven't been done on Survivor. I think we have a season where people will say you can never go back to what you were before."

It's not the first time a primetime reality show has flirted with race, though it will be the first time one follows through.

Last year, Donald Trump hinted that The Apprentice was toying with the idea of dividing his two teams by race, only to backtrack on the notion when backlash started up, saying "I personally don't like it, so it will never happen."

Survivor: Cook Islands kicks off Sept. 14. Here's a list of the competitors:

Rebecca Borman, 24, makeup artist, Laurelton, New York;

Anh-Tuan "Cao Boi" Bui, 42, nail salon manager, Christiansburg, Virginia;

Sekou Bunch, 45, jazz musician, Los Angeles;

J.P. Calderon, 30, pro volleyball player, Marina Del Rey, California;

Cristina Coria, 35, police officer, Los Angeles;

Stephannie Favor, 35, nursing student, Columbia, South Carolina;

Billy Garcia, 36, heavy metal guitarist, New York City;

Adam Gentry, 28, copier sales, San Diego;

Nathan Gonzalez, 26, retail sales, Los Angeles;

Jenny Guzon-Bae, 36, real estate agent, Lake Forest, Illinois;

Yul Kwon, 31, management consultant, San Mateo, California;

Becky Lee, 28, attorney, Washington, D.C.;

Oscar "Ozzy" Lusth, 25, waiter, Venice, California;

Cecilia Mansilla, 29, technology risk consultant, Oakland;

Sundra Oakley, 31, actress, Los Angeles;

Jonathan Penner, 44, writer/producer, Los Angeles;

Parvati Shallow, 23, boxer/waitress, Los Angeles;

Jessica Smith, 27, performance artist/rollergirl, Chico, California;

Brad Virata, 29, fashion director, Los Angeles;

Candice Woodcock, 23, premed student, Fayetteville, North Carolina.

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Guest StarBaby

Yes, I saw this on the news tonight and just cringed. The whole idea makes me a little uncomfortable. I think it is great that they wanted more diversity in the cast, but separating them according to race just doesn't seem like a good idea to me.

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Although the concept is a bit questionable, I think all of the "war of the races" hype is just hype. I have a feeling the tribes will be merged too soon for a real race issue.

It's also nice to see MB & crew back to their tricks of only having really attractive or character people who already have "talent agents". Once again, I'm rooting for the older Asian guy. If he goes out with irritable bowels, I will be the first one to shout this show is RIGGED!! :P

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I think most of it is hype too. I think the tribes will merge as quick as the age tribes merged last season.

....................................................................

Courtesy of: REALITYBLURRED

Mark Burnett says "maybe that taboo (of race) could disappear through" Survivor Cook Islands

Survivor executive producer Mark Burnett is responding to reaction about the 13th season

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A Racy Twist for "Survivor"

By Gina Serpe Wed Aug 23, 7:21 PM ET

Some may call it exploiting racial tensions. CBS calls it darn good television.

ADVERTISEMENT

Jeff Probst popped in on The Early Show Wednesday morning, confirming the reports that the 20 castaways for Survivor: Cook Islands will be grouped by race, with competitors divided into four tribes consisting of whites, blacks, Asians and Hispanics.

Apparently, "separate but equal" holds only the warmest of connotations for Mark Burnett.

Like a good host, Probst had nothing but praise for the producers' controversial brainchild, calling the exercise in segregation a valuable social experiment, rather than a stunt to dig up some controversy--and raise ratings.

"The idea for this actually came from the criticism that Survivor was not ethnically diverse enough, because for whatever reason, we always have a low number of minority applicants apply for the show," Probst said.

"So we set out and said, 'Let's turn this criticism into creative for the show.' And I think it fits perfectly with what Survivor does, which is, it is a social experiment. And this is adding another layer to that experiment, which is taking the show to a completely different level."

Different level, yes. Good level, still to be determined.

"If I had been a producer of this show, it is not an idea I would have come up with or given approval to," Robert Thompson, director of the Center for the Study of Popular Television at Syracuse University, told E! Online. "It's like a return back to segregated leagues in sports. The unseemly interest this will invite certainly is not worth the dramatic elements it's going to bring."

"To the less-than-open minded person, it is very easy to trash us," Burnett explained to Entertainment Weekly. "But we're smart enough to not make it negative. We're smart enough to have gotten rid of every racist person in casting."

Though more to the point, the producers haven't and can't weed out every racially sensitive person in their audience who may take offense to the seemingly archaic, and potentially socially irresponsible, division.

While the 43-year-old host admitted that the players themselves had "mixed reactions" to the racial separation, he made clear that the division was not meant to incite any controversy, add to the tension during the competition or simply be viewed as a gimmick.

"Our original idea was simply to have the most ethnically diverse group of people on TV. It wasn't until we got to casting and started noticing this theme of ethnic pride that we started thinking, 'Wow, if culture is still playing such a big part in these people's lives, that's our idea. Let's divide them based on ethnicity,' " he said.

Though not everyone is as excited about the idea as Probst and his Survivor crew.

"It sounds like a gimmick a lot of people are going to have real issues as to the taste of," Thompson said.

Referencing Burnett's previous experiments on Survivor and The Apprentice to divide teams by boys vs. girls and, more recently on the latter, by street smarts vs. book smarts, Thompson said that "these things don't often work so well in less dicey situations."

And any publicity is good publicity, right?

"As far as getting some attention, getting it talked about again, this'll do it," Thompson said. "Survivor is a great game. It's the gold standard of reality TV. But nobody seems to talk about it anymore."

Or watch it.

Survivor: Cook Islands will be the reality show's 13th installment and comes on the heels of the least watched season in the series' history. Despite garnering an Emmy nod for Best Reality Competition, Survivor: Panama--Exile Island, which split the tribes based on gender and age, averaged a franchise-low 16.8 million viewers. Hence the latest drastic measure.

CBS Entertainment president Nina Tassler told EW that while she was hesitant to give the go-ahead on the "risky idea," she finally relented, saying it was the logical next step in "a show that explores social politics."

"It's not just 18 white people," Probst told the magazine. "Suddenly you have new slang, new rituals--people doing things like making fire in ways that haven't been done on Survivor. I think we have a season where people will say you can never go back to what you were before."

It's not the first time a primetime reality show has flirted with race, though it will be the first time one follows through.

Last year, Donald Trump hinted that The Apprentice was toying with the idea of dividing his two teams by race, only to backtrack on the notion when backlash started up, saying "I personally don't like it, so it will never happen."

Survivor: Cook Islands kicks off Sept. 14. Here's a list of the competitors:

* Rebecca Borman, 24, makeup artist, Laurelton, New York;

* Anh-Tuan "Cao Boi" Bui, 42, nail salon manager, Christiansburg, Virginia;

* Sekou Bunch, 45, jazz musician, Los Angeles;

* J.P. Calderon, 30, pro volleyball player, Marina Del Rey, California;

* Cristina Coria, 35, police officer, Los Angeles;

* Stephannie Favor, 35, nursing student, Columbia, South Carolina;

* Billy Garcia, 36, heavy metal guitarist, New York City;

* Adam Gentry, 28, copier sales, San Diego;

* Nathan Gonzalez, 26, retail sales, Los Angeles;

* Jenny Guzon-Bae, 36, real estate agent, Lake Forest, Illinois;

* Yul Kwon, 31, management consultant, San Mateo, California;

* Becky Lee, 28, attorney, Washington, D.C.;

* Oscar "Ozzy" Lusth, 25, waiter, Venice, California;

* Cecilia Mansilla, 29, technology risk consultant, Oakland;

* Sundra Oakley, 31, actress, Los Angeles;

* Jonathan Penner, 44, writer/producer, Los Angeles;

* Parvati Shallow, 23, boxer/waitress, Los Angeles;

* Jessica Smith, 27, performance artist/rollergirl, Chico, California;

* Brad Virata, 29, fashion director, Los Angeles;

* Candice Woodcock, 23, premed student, Fayetteville, North Carolina.

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Courtesy of: REALITY TV MAGAZINE

Survivor Plays The Race Card, What

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At first when I heard how they had set this season up it kind of seemed desperate and in poor taste. But after checking out the bios at the website, it looks like it'll be another good season - the guys are superhot!!!!! :wub::P

And the players seem to be somewhat older this time around - that's nice to see :)

When they had the men/women/young/old last season, didn't it end up with one of each in the final 4? Maybe the groupings'll again be a nonissue . . .

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12 out of 20 are from California

Why do so many of these reality shows have a higher number of people from California?

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because that's where all of the "talent" agents are, silly. I guess more people who want to be celebrities move out to California...or it could be the most populated states...I don't know.

Although my home town is represented again!! Hopefully she will come off better than Alli on the Apprentice.

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I think this is an interesting idea. To be honest with you...it happens all the time. My daughter's high school (in California) is incredibly diverse and the kids, for the most part, hang out with kids from their own race. No one really talks about that....Will Survivor get us to talking about it?

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Maybe because my heritage is roughly two straps away from a tube top, but just by reading the bios and looking at their pictures, I had a hard time figuring out who went where. I know they said they were this or their parents immigrated from there, but like Nathan "Nate" Gonzalez, could really be in three of the four groups. Gonzalez makes me this he'd go in the Hispanic group, he's appearance makes me think he'd go into the Black group, but his nickname is "Nate" which implores he belongs with the White group. :P

When I pulled up Stephanies bio, my jaw dropped because I thought it was Fantasia. I mean look:

299x623_stephannie.jpg

Which instantly puts her at the top of my winner list, eventhough she is a Clemson grad.

Just at a glance:

Three musicians (two established & one breaking into)

Four "in the business" (Actress, Make-up artist, fasion director, & writer/ producer

Four frat guys

Three professional athletes (pro volleyball, boxer & Rollergirl)

Two medical-type students

Two attorneys

BTW - Yul scares the crap out of me. He worked with Sen Lieberman, helped write some of the Homesland Security sections AND is onto "politics and ultimate fighting". Holy Crap!! What can this guy not do...besides win Survivor :P

And one "Loyal Order of Moose" - whatever that means...

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By age its....

3 in their 40's

8 in their 30's

and 9 in their 20's

Ozzy looks like he is barely out of Jr. High.

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when I saw the preview for it, I thought I saw Howie in there, and I said WTF? I think I might have glimpsed the guy named Adam.

Did anyone else think the same thing?

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