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Deal or No Deal


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#1
Brekkie Boy

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Deal or No Deal is a hit around the world, and a couple of months after arriving in the UK it's about to air on NBC, a year after ABC rejected it.


Now, I don't know what format your using - but the basic concept is the same. There are a number of boxes and a number of amounts of money, from $0.01 to $1m - all of which are hidden inside the boxes.

The player picks a box and then must open the other boxes to find out what they haven't won - trying to avoid the high prizes. Every few boxes the player gets a call from the "Banker" who offers to buy their box for an amount which depends on how the game is going. The fewer high numbers revealed, the better the offer. Here the player has to decide "Deal or No Deal" - take the guaranteed cash from the banker or play on in the hope your box contains alot of money.


The Aussie version has 26 boxes, with 6 opened in round 1, 5 in R2, 4 in R3, 3 in R4, 2 in R5 and then individually - with a call from the banker at the end of each round.

The UK version has 22 boxes, with 5 opened in round 1 then 3 in each further round.

In both cases we come down to 2 boxes - and if one of the big numbers remains you can expect a high offer from the banker (usually midway between the two) - and if your brave enough, you can say NO DEAL and open your box.


And the most interesting thing about this format is even if the player deals early, the game continues to see what would of happened and if the player dealt too soon.


Now if you didn't understand that, perhaps playing yourself will make things clearer (WARNING: HIGHLY ADDICTIVE)

http://www.geocities...dgypa/deal.html

#2
Francis_3

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God, Not Howie Mandell for a host!!

#3
Dade

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Courtesy of: ZAP2IT.COM

NBC Lets Viewers in on 'Deal'


Friday, December 16, 2005
10:55 AM PT



Next week, TV viewers will get a chance to watch people sweat over unknown piles of cash on NBC's "Deal or No Deal." And, the network says, viewers will get to sweat a little too.
The network has added an interactive component to the game in which viewers at home can get a shot at winning $10,000 by choosing, via text message or online vote, one of the money-holding briefcases in the televised game. During each night of "Deal or No Deal," which airs for five nights starting Monday, Dec. 19, one case will be chosen as the "lucky case," with winners chosen randomly from those who picked the right one.

Winners will be chosen in three time zones -- Eastern/Central (which get the same broadcast feed), Mountain, Pacific -- and announced live during the broadcast in each of those time zones.


Hosted by comedian Howie Mandel, "Deal or No Deal" is essentially a test of will for players hoping to win a cash prize. In each game, the player will pick one of 26 briefcases -- containing amounts of money from a penny to $1 million -- to keep as his or her own, then eliminate the others one by one.
Periodically, an entity known as "The Bank" will players whether they want to keep their own case or take the average of the dollar amount in the remaining cases -- leading to the question of the title.

Details on the viewer component of "Deal or No Deal" will be at NBC.com once the show debuts.

................................................................................
..........

Courtesy of: NBC.COM

SHOW AIRS Monday December 19 - Friday December 23

The rules are simple. Choose a briefcase. Then as each round progresses, you must either stay with your original briefcase choice or make a "deal" with the bank to accept their cash offer in exchange for whatever dollar amount is in your chosen case.

Once you decide to accept or decline the bank's offer, the decision is final.

Contestants are encouraged to ask friends or family in the audience for advice; however, only the contestant's answer will be considered binding and final.

#4
Dade

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Courtesy of: ZAP2IT.COM

Mandel Says 'Deal or No Deal'

By Kate O'Hare
Sunday, December 18, 2005
12:00 AM PT

Somewhere in the misty depths of human history, a caveman may have been standing with an armload of ostrich eggs when suddenly he spied a tasty rabbit munching on a nearby berry bush.
As the rabbit threatened to hop away, this early human was faced with a decision -- drop the eggs, grab the slingshot tucked in the back of his loincloth and maybe wind up with roasted rabbit for dinner, or let the rabbit go and have a guaranteed, if less juicy and succulent, omelet.

Several thousand years of human civilization later, very little has changed.


This is evident Monday, Dec. 19, when NBC premieres a five-night run of "Deal or No Deal," the hourlong U.S. version of Endemol USA's ("Fear Factor") worldwide sensation, already a huge hit in around 40 countries, including Australia, the U.K., Italy, Thailand and Argentina. Howie Mandel, seen most recently in the Bravo series "Hidden Howie: The Private Life of a Public Nuisance," is host.
Wikipedia, the online encyclopedia, describes "Deal or No Deal" as "an exercise in game theory, where a player has to determine whether he values having one amount of money more or less than possible future winnings."

Presented with 26 sealed briefcases containing monetary amounts between a penny and $1 million, the contestant chooses one. As the rest of the briefcases are systematically opened, revealing which dollar amounts the contestant doesn't get, an unseen "banker" offers her or him a guaranteed cash amount to abandon the original briefcase and quit the game.

At any point, both the "banker" and the contestant are looking at the as-yet-hidden amounts to determine just how likely it is that the largest available amount is in that first briefcase. If the available amounts start to get smaller and smaller, so do the "banker's" offers. And to make things more fun, the contestant receives advice from family members seated nearby.

An actor and comedian, Mandel has never been the host of a game show, but that changed after one night in a Jerry's Deli in Los Angeles' San Fernando Valley, on the invitation of a producer of the show.

"So I go to this restaurant," Mandel says, "and he deals out these cards. They're sitting face down and he says, 'Pick a card, but you can't see what the card is, and all these cards have amounts of money.' He starts playing the game with me at the table, but he doesn't tell me this is the pitch. I don't know what he's doing.

"I play the game, and he starts making me offers. 'If I gave you $20,000 instead of that amount on that card there, the one that you chose ... .' I really started getting into the game. It's an amazing game. There's never been anything on TV that depicts the purest form of human instinct."

Asked if that instinct is just greed, Mandel says, "Not only greed. Yes, we all want more, and there isn't anyone alive that doesn't want more. But I'm not quizzing anybody. There are no stunts. There's no nothing. It's just that human condition, and the human condition is so fascinating."

Mandel compares the emotions on "Deal or No Deal" with what happens to people inside a casino.

"There are two elements playing in human nature," he says. "Most people don't see the opportunity come around, so they say, 'This is an opportunity. I'm going to go for it. When am I going to get another shot to maybe go for it, even though this money is right in front of me?'

"When I talk to a lot of contestants afterward, I would ask them, 'Why did you give up on that money you were offered? [The other element is], I don't think that people look at winnings or offerings as theirs. Say, play is really hot one night, and you win 10 or 20 grand in Vegas. Personally, I'm not a gambler, so I would probably pull it off the table and go home before I lose it.

"What a lot of people do, and what those buildings are built on, is they put it back on the table and then go, 'Well, I'm down five grand. I was up 20 grand, now I'm down five grand.' I go, 'You were up 20 grand and now you're down five grand?' They go, 'Ah, I was playing with their money.'

"I get turning down $40,000 when you've only opened four cases and there are still seven giant amounts on the board, but when the odds start turning, when you get to the end of the game ... watch how people react."

And like any popular game show, from "The $64,000 Question" to "Who Wants to Be a Millionaire," the audience must and does get involved.

"They tell me they've been testing it in focus groups," Mandel says, "and people are on the edge, yelling. That's why NBC has something here."

Apparently, the show got to Mandel as well. "It was the most exciting thing I've ever been a part of. I was right there. It feels like an event, a real study of human nature. I'm probably making more of it than it is.

"If I wasn't hosting it, I swear to you, I'd be watching it."

But shooting the five episodes of the show also posed a personal challenge for Mandel. As fans of his Bravo series know, he has a strong aversion to shaking hands.

"I still don't shake hands," he says. "I'm all right with the hugging, it's just the hands I have a problem with. It's the petri dish that we carry.

"But the producers said, 'We don't want to deal with that. We don't want to talk about your O.C.D. on this show.' I don't think it was obvious that I didn't shake one contestant's hand. I hug, put my arm around, but I can't shake hands. It's just me."

Edited by Dade, 18 December 2005 - 08:48 AM.


#5
Dade

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Coutesy of: TV GUIDE, INSIDER

Is NBC's Big Deal the New Millionaire?

by Matt Webb Mitovich

Who still wants to be a millionaire? The contestants on NBC's Deal or No Deal, a new game show airing every night this week at 8 pm/ET, apparently do. Why else would they put themselves through the nerve-frazzling agony of deciding whether to keep one unopened case ó which could contain anywhere from a penny to a cool mil ó or "deal" it to the mysterious Bank for what could be a higher (or, natch, lower) payout. Sound a touch confusing here on "paper"? Let host Howie Mandel try to sum up the series, which is already a massive hit internationally.

Each contestant, confronted with a stage full of fab femmes, each holding a numbered case, "picks a number, and one of 26 different increments of money is in each box," Mandel says. But instead of simply popping open the chosen case to assess your bounty and whether you should walk away with it, "the way to find out what's in your box is to open up the other boxes, because obviously what's not in those boxes could be in yours."

But here is the added twist: Along the way, the Bank (a shadowy figure) will try to make a deal for the contestant's unopened box, creating the inevitable dilemma of "Is what I'm holding worth more or less than what they're offering?" (Ah, nostalgic shades of Let's Make a Deal's "Do you want to trade for what's behind door No. 2?") "The Bank will make you an offer of, say, $50,000 to give me the case you chose and go home," Mandel explains, "or you can say 'no deal,' but then you have to open another five cases before I make another offer. There are times when you get down to two cases, one with $5 and one with a million, and I'll offer you a half million. Do you take the 50-50 chance?" Amazingly, says the host, "Some people go for it!"

Due to its bare-bones play element (and the absence of trivia questions), one which anyone can relate to, Deal or No Dea ranks as "the most dramatic show I have ever seen," Mandel raves. "You have people who have never owned a home or are in great debt, so these moments could be life-changing."

Mandel, as host, can only stand by as each player makes what may or may not be a questionable decision. (He himself has no idea what amount is within each numbered case.) "If they take a deal because I swayed them, it wouldn't be a good thing," he notes. "I'm simply there to tell you the benefits of each choice."

And then, of course, he asks the dreaded question: "Deal or no deal?" Hey, do we finally have a winning successor to "Is that your final answer?" Is "Deal or no deal?" all Mandel will be hearing from myriad passersby in the times to come? "I hope we do have the next catchphrase," he says. "That would only mean that [our show] was incredibly successful."

But until the tribe, I mean public, has spoken, Mandel will have to content himself with trying to learn the names of the 26 leggy ladies who brandish each case each night. "One guy couldn't even get his [selection] out, he was just staring at this wall of beauty," he reports with a laugh. "It's a very, very, very powerful image. There is definitely something in this game for everyone."




(Poster note: I agree MO...meet you in chat to talk about!!)

#6
nursie

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well im watching this Deal or No Deal show tonight, and i like it....however,
i can tell it will quickly become boring yesterday's news just like 'the missing link' and 'who wants to be a millionare' ...but for now its ok to pass an hour

#7
Dade

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OMG she turned down 138,000...for a 1 in 4 shot at half a million!!!!

she ended up with $25,000. Well that's better then what was in the suitcase, $500.

#8
nursie

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well you know for the rest of their lives, any time that family has an argument about ANYTHING- that woman is going to yell out 'remember when i turned down that deal for you stupid people ??!?!'

#9
jersey721

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I caught it half way through and I was totally confused. I must have missed the rules & explanation. I'll give it a shot again next week from the beginning and hopefully I'll be able to follow what's going on. I'll take any reality TV at this point.

#10
Pallaton

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QUOTE(nursie @ Dec 20 2005, 02:03 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
well you know for the rest of their lives, any time that family has an argument about ANYTHING- that woman is going to yell out 'remember when i turned down that deal for you stupid people ??!?!'




Lol.... if that had happened to me I would always bring it up too.
MAN I'd be PO'd. She should've told her stupid ass family to shut the hell up and did what she wanted.
The show is pretty fun to watch, but I don't see it being a long term thing.

#11
wash ur face

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Good Lord how do some of these people remain employed? I have my speculations, but I won't even go there. I cannot watch this show because of Howie Mandell. Dude looks straight crazy on the previews too when he says Deal...or NO DEAL? Gilbert Godfrey went away, why can't Howie?

#12
wickedclownoj

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anyone watch it. i like it alot

#13
Dade

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LOL yes ...thread for it is in Reality tv

#14
Dade

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$189,000 that got my attention. glad he took it...he got a better deal then the woman last night

#15
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Courtesy of: TV GUIDE, THE WATERCOOLER

Deal or No Deal


Things I donít like about this show? The whole letís cut to commercial to build suspense. That really starts to get on my nerves. I don't like it when Ryan Seacrest does it on Idol and I don't dig it here. I just wish it would move along at a bit of a faster clip. I also donít like the shadowy banker. He sits up high and watches the proceedings, is it even the same guy all the time? Is it even a guy? Also, I donít know that I like the way that the families either egg on the contestants or try and dissuade them. It is a little distracting, Iíd like to see the person try and suss out the odds on their own. Probably a little less dramatic but it would make it more interesting to me, and actually make it more of a challenge. But there is a lot that I do like, it is fun to try and calculate odds and do the math. I canít help but wonder if the models had to have special training on how to open the latches on the briefcases. Or if they practiced exactly how to open them at a slow pace so that it would build up the tension. The contestants cracked me up. I liked the guy who considered himself unlucky and avoided getting greedy and managed to take home a decent amount of cash. I also really liked Amy who admitted that she was wearing her ďlucky bra.Ē Even Howie cracked up at that and revealed that he was wearing his lucky underwear. Interesting. Guess I'll tune in again, thankfully I've got TiVo to fast forward through the slowish parts. ó Angel Cohn

#16
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I really like this show too and felt bad when the first contestant listened to her stupid family. she said its in number 8---why didnt she pick that case first then?

i also get tired of --lets see after the break--too.

but i still like the show for now.

#17
Dade

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Courtesy of: TV GUIDE, THE WATERCOOLER

Deal or No Deal


You know what would be fun? If the contestants had to dress up in silly costumes like they did on Letís Make a Deal. That might help this show shed its overly dramatic image. Howie almost had that bemused look that Monty Hall used to have when he could just tell that the people were making a crazy gamble. Howie shook his head totally flabbergasted when Daryl turned down a decent amount of cash for a long-shot chance at a half million dollars. I know Iíve complained about the families, and trust me it annoyed me to no end when they got Amyís little kids on the phone to find out what they thoughtÖ as if they had a clue what the heck was happening. However, I have to say that I liked Darylís brother who in a weird way ó perhaps because of the way he was spouting his own random family philosophies ó reminded me of the dad on Everybody Hates Chris. He talked his bro into taking a deal because as he so accurately surmised, ďWe canít do nothing with 50 bucks.Ē Well, Iím still mildly entertained by this show, I just hope that they donít make it like Millionaire and make it over exposed. Once or twice a year for a week is just fine. ó Angel Cohn

#18
jersey721

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At first I couldn't understand the way the game worked. Now that I'm getting it. . . I find it extremely boring. I just prefer games I can play along with at home. . . like Jeopardy, Millionnaire, etc. I guess it's "no deal" for me.

#19
FLYNWA

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i am still likeing the show but i am gonna stop watching because i am sick of

we'll find out after the break.......its boring....i just flick through the channels like any other man....then i go back once the commercials are over

#20
Dade

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Courtesy of: TV GUIDE, THE WATERCOOLER

Deal or No Deal


Almost the entire episode was one contestant, which only goes to prove my point that they really need to speed this show up. I love game shows probably more than the next person but the fact that if there is one player who just is uninteresting on and they take up a good 45 minutes then the show just drags. The first player of the night Traci, had this screechy squeal/scream that really got on my nerves. Plus, by bringing out her entire grade school class it just added to the length of this episode. All I kept thinking was that it was teaching young kids to gamble, having them scream "No Deal." And Traci brought her uncle/boss who just happens to also be a priest. Which had me wondering if it was sort of an unfair advantage to have a man of the cloth on your side? Just a thought. But though Traci took home a big chunk of change, I actually couldn't have cared less what she did. But Crystal, who was relegated to the last eight minutes or so, was actually kind of fun. I'll actually watch tomorrow night to see her in action. Even Howie and the banker thought she was spunky and fun. I do have to admit that her enthusiasm was infectious and not in a bad like rash kinda way.

ó Angel Cohn


(It was agreed in chat last night that a week straight of this show was too much...once a week would be great. I don't lilke the 'extra' people brought in, the family is more then enough. Still like this show and will watch tonight.)




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